Which food bowl is best for older cats?

As cats age, they can become fussy eaters who may balk at their once beloved food dish. Senior cats, over age 7, often develop issues with digestion, which can exacerbate feeding issues even more. 

There are many different types of food dishes that cat’s eat from, including a flat dish, elevated dish, slow feeder dish, or different materials including stainless steel, porcelain, or plastic dishes to choose from. Elevated food bowls are designed to keep the food higher than your cat’s stomach, versus below the stomach with a traditional bowl or plate. A slow feeder forces your cat to slow down when eating, and can reduce the risk of vomiting or bloat. An elevated dish or a slow feeder can also help keep your cat’s weight in check by forcing them to eat more slowly than they would with a traditional flat bowl or plate. 

Elevated food bowls can help keep food in the bowl as well as help improve your cat’s digestion. An elevated food bowl can make it easier for your cat to eat, and helps keep spilled food and water to a minimum. An elevated bowl helps cats eat in a more natural position. She will also typically eat less when her bowl is a little higher than ground level. Elevated bowls can also help to prevent spine and hip problems commonly seen in older cats.

Another consideration with elevated food bowls for cats is gastric reflux. Older cats tend to have reflux and an elevated bowl tends to alleviate some of the symptoms associated with reflux. Raised food bowls can also help aid your cat’s digestion. Cats are also more likely to eat better with an elevated food bowl, because the food stays put and their is less strain on their body – which is especially important for older cats. 

Certain elevated food bowls, provide better comfort for cats when they eat and also provide backflow prevention. Other elevated bowls have an inner lip that means food won’t spill out of the bowl. 

When considering an elevated food bowl for your cat, there are many types of materials to choose from: stainless steel, porcelain, plastic, etc. Our preference is porcelain. Porcelain dishes do not absorb bacteria the way plastic dishes can and stainless steel dishes can be radioactive. Plastic dishes can also cause feline acne, due to a cat’s allergic reaction to the plastic. Porcelain dishes are dishwasher and microwave safe, and although more delicate/fragile than other types of dishes, they are the easiest to keep clean. 

Before you purchase an elevated food dish, consider the height of the bowl. An ideal height for an elevated feeding dish is cat’s knee height. Simply measure your cat’s leg up to the height of her knee to determine the ideal height of the elevated food bowl for your cat. 

Should you consider purchasing an elevated food bowl, please support our sponsor by visiting their website to learn more about their elevated cat food bowls. 

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet. 

Do Large Breed Older Dogs Need Orthopedic Pet Beds?

Large breed dogs such as mastiff, great dane or other big dogs have special needs and health issues that other smaller breeds don’t have. As these dogs age, these health issues can become much worse. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, a large breed dog is considered a senior at age 5 or 6 years of age. 

Because these dogs carry massive amounts of weight, many of these dogs endure a lot of strain on their skeletal system, muscles, joints and ligaments – making them more prone to health issues in these areas. The keys to health and longevity of large breed dogs is proper nutrition, good quality dog food, low impact exercise to protect the joints, and good quality bedding that is large enough to accommodate their large frame. 

Your local veterinarian is your best source of information for caring for a large breed dog, especially an older dog, especially when it comes to their nutritional needs and exercise. Typically, most vets recommend low impact exercise for large breed dogs, like walking or swimming. Running tends to be harder on the joints and can wear down their joints faster, so minimizing running is typically recommended. 

Large breed dogs, especially older dogs, tend to sleep around 18 hours per day on average, meaning they are laying down most of the day. If your dog is not getting healthy REM sleep, his body will tire more quickly and he will experience more stress throughout the day. 

It is very important to find a dog bed that will provide proper support for hips, joints and bones to protect them from common illnesses like hip dysplasia, arthritis, and a host of other joint and skeletal issues. If your older large breed dog is slowing down, and resting more than usual, it may be time to consider a quality dog bed that provides the support they need. A good, quality dog bed will give your older dog more energy and better quality of life, especially if their quality of sleep is better. 

A therapeutic large breed dog bed will help soothe and reduce symptoms of canine ailments endemic to big dogs. A quality dog bed can reduce these symptoms through better circulation, proper support and a more restful and deep sleep. Dog beds that crumple and cave in don’t allow for optimum circulation due to uneven support. Uneven support can even cut off blood flow to certain areas of a dog’s body. 

Good circulation and blood flow is the key to good health, but also key to assisting the body in repairing injured or sore areas. A supportive and comfortable dog bed can alleviate the pain and symptoms of arthritis and other ailments. 

A good therapeutic bed will allow your dog to rest and sleep more soundly, which will help promote better longevity as well as joint, hip and overall health. 

A proper dog bed will not only optimize circulation, but it will also cushion and take stress off joints and hips. A true therapeutic dog bed will evenly support and cushion these problem areas of older big dogs. 

Memory foam is the leading foam for dog beds. It is also known as visco elastic foam or some variation of that foam. However, dog beds that are 100% memory foam are not ideal because they lack a supportive base to provide optimal benefits. When selecting a large breed dog bed, look for a dog bed that has memory foam but also a supportive foam base. 

Here are some other features to look for in an orthopedic dog bed.

  • CertiPUR-US Certified Foam
  • Foam is free of PBDEs, TDCPP or TCEP (“Tris”) flame retardants, mercury, lead, heavy metals, formaldehyde, phthalates, CFC’s.
  • Non-Hazardous Foam
  • Foam Designed For Large Breed Dog Beds
  • No-Flat Guarantee
  • Non-Toxic, Hypoallergenic Materials
  • 4.5 lb Density Orthopedic Memory Foam Dog Bed
  • Heavy Duty Zipper With Cover To Prevent Chewing

To learn more about orthopedic pet bedding, visit the Bully Beds website below. 

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet.

How to Help a Senior Dog with Incontinence

As dogs get older, they may start to lose control over their bladder and bowels. Oftentimes, incontinence can be a symptom of several types of conditions. Certain breeds are more prone to develop incontinence and female dogs are more likely to develop urinary incontinence. Certain large breed dogs are more common to develop fecal incontinence. There are several medications that can be used to help with dog incontinence. 

If your senior dog has issues with incontinence, it is advisable that you consult with your vet first to determine the underlying condition. Dog diapers, belly bands and pee pads can help manage senior dog incontinence. Washable bedding and plastic sheets can also be used to help protect flooring or furniture. Water restriction, especially at bedtime, may also help in some cases. 

It’s important to note that house trained dogs often feel embarrassed when they soil indoors. Pee pads or indoor training can also help, as can taking your pet out more often. Dog diapers can be used, depending on the severity of the incontinence and whether it is urine or fecal. There are both disposable and washable diapers. Belly bands are used for male dogs to inhibit peeing, but they can also be used for light incontinence when used with a panty liner placed inside to soak up urine. Overalls are great for dogs who try to remove the diapers. Pee pads are great for dogs who may have difficulty getting up and down stairs to go outside, or for those senior dogs who may have frequent urination due to illness.  

Below are a few examples of incontinence products you might consider for senior dogs with incontinence issues. We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult with your vet before treating dog incontinence to rule out medical issues that can be treated by your vet. 

 

Disposable Male Dog Wraps

Disposable diapers should be adjustable to fit your dog comfortably. If the diaper has elastic edges it will allow for freedom of movement and leg lifting comfort. A wetness indicator helps you know when the diaper needs changing. 

Washable Male Wraps Diapers

Washable diapers are nice because they have no crinkle or uncomfortable texture. A velcro closure makes taking them on and off easy. Be sure the diaper pad sewn inside has a waterproof outer layer to prevent leaks and damage to rugs, etc. 

Female Dog Disposable Diapers

Disposable diapers designed for female dogs provide leak protection for dogs in heat, for dogs who suffer from excitable urination or incontinent dogs. Female dog diapers can also be used for urine, poop, diarrhea, and bowel incontinence. 

Washable Female Dog Diapers

Dog Diaper Overall

If your senior pet doesn’t like wearing an incontinence product then you may want to consider a diaper overall that cannot be easily pulled off.  Overall diapers are also suitable for odd-shaped or long-body dogs. 

Waterproof Dog Bed

A waterproof dog bed can be used as a stand-alone bed or inside a dog crate and is helpful for incontinent dogs because the washable cover zips off and is waterproof with a rubber grip non slip bottom. 

Indoor Potties

Some incontinent dogs have trouble getting outside, either due to hip dysplasia or arthritis, and become incontinent because of the difficulty they have getting in and out of the house. Indoor potties are also helpful if you are away extended hours and can’t give your pet the relief they need, especially as they age and cannot hold their urine or feces as long as they did when they were younger. 

Providing your senior dog with an indoor area to potty can help dogs get to their potty area faster, especially if going outside means navigating stairs or waiting for an elevator. This type of potty can be used on a balcony, deck or indoors for your pet’s convenience. 

Dog Urine Cleaning Products

Eliminate odors and stains, including urine, feces, vomit and drool with a stain and odor remover meant to eliminated dog incontinence messes. A product with a natural enzyme formula is safe for pets and home and can be used on floors, carpets, furniture, clothing, litter boxes, kennels, crates, and car upholstery.

Supplements for Urinary Health

If your dog is having difficulty with urine flow and inflammation or leaking urine, then it is important to speak with your vet about causes and potential treatments. Supplements may be prescribed to help reduce inflammation and encourage a healthy urine flow. Always consult with your vet before giving your dog any supplements as some can interfere with medications your dog may be taking. 

Top 10 Reasons Your Senior Dog or Cat is Finicky

As pets age, pet feeding can become more challenging especially if your senior pet has become more finicky during meal time. Although it may seem counter-intuitive, some older pets just don’t love to eat. Pet feeding can become a real source of stress for pet parents, especially if your cat or dog was a hearty eater at one time. It can be especially concerning if your senior pet is also losing weight, or has developed other illnesses that may require eating in order to administer medications. 

There are many reasons a senior pet won’t eat, some are more serious than others, but if at any time your pet is becoming more finicky and is eating less and less, and especially if they are losing weight, they should be evaluated by a veterinarian or vet nutritionist. 

Here are the top 10 reasons a senior pet may become finicky at meal time. 

  1. Too much people food. 

Once dogs or cats have a taste of people food, they can become increasingly finicky about eating their commercial dog or cat food. Let’s face it, people food generally has more fat and flavor, both of which may not be appropriate for your senior pet, but nonetheless, just taste better. If your senior pet’s appetite is changing and people treats and table scraps have become a more regular part of your pet’s diet, it stands to reason that they may start to turn their nose up at their commercial pet food. 

One way to help is to stop feeding your pet people food and table scraps. Stick to a dog or cat food that is designed for pets. People food simply does not have the proper nutrients a dog or cat needs to flourish. For more on cat or dog foods, read our article on senior pet food. 

       2. Change in schedule

Pets are creatures of habit and rely on their pet parents to keep to a regular feeding / potty schedule. If you constantly change their routine, feeding them at different times on different days, this can cause them to become more finicky at mealtime. 

One way to help is to ensure that your pet is fed at approximately the same time of day every day. If your work schedule dictates that you feed your pet very early in the morning, try to feed your pet within an hour of that same time each day. Being a responsible pet parent means making your pet a priority. If your senior pet is more finicky and your feeding schedule is erratic, this fluctuation in his feeding schedule can be the cause. 

      3. Stress

If you recently moved, added a new member to the family, a death in the family or divorce, or a new pet has been added to the home, your senior pet may be feeling anxious about the changes. This anxiety can be causing your pet stress that can be affecting his appetite. Another consideration is distractions that cause stress at mealtime – thunderstorms, fireworks, or too much activity during mealtime may be causing your pet stress. 

One way to help is to monitor your pet closely and offer lots of love, attention and extra exercise. Exercise will help your pet feel less stressed and may also help your pet to work up an appetite. If loud noise or people are distracting your pet from eating, you may want to move your pet to an isolated/quiet area so he can focus on eating, instead of the commotion. 

      4. Stomach Upset

As pet’s age, their appetite may change because their stomach has become more sensitive to certain foods. If your pet has developed a food sensitivity, it may be time to switch his food. If stomach upset is the cause of your pet’s finickiness, talk with your vet about switching his food or introducing a medication to help ease stomach upset in pets. There are medications that can help ease stomach discomfort and help pets feel better. 

If your vet recommends switching your pet’s food, read our article on pet food for senior pets.

     5. Illness or injury

If your pet is not eating, it is important that a vet evaluate your pet for an underlying illness. If your pet has had a recent injury or illness has been diagnosed, it can affect his appetite. A pet who doesn’t eat great for a few days may not be a great concern especially if there is a specific cause. However, if your pet goes more than a day or two without eating, then it is important to have him seen by the vet again. 

Vet’s can help by taking xrays and blood work to determine other reasons why your pet may not want to eat. Your vet can also prescribe an appetite stimulant if no other cause has been identified. If it turns out that an injury is the cause, and pain is the issue, then a pain reliever may help ease your pet’s discomfort to where he enjoys eating again. If an illness is the culprit, medication to help treat the illness may help alleviate symptoms and help your pet feel better.  

      6. Medication

If your pet is ill and taking medication, some medications can cause stomach upset and also cause a pet not to want to eat. If you recently introduced a new medication and your pet is refusing to eat, talk with your vet about alternatives. Oftentimes there are other comparable medications that won’t have stomach upset as a side effect. 

If the medication is causing the stomach upset, then switching the medication may help. If there are no alternatives, then your vet may prescribe an appetite stimulant to help get your pet to eat. 

      7. Bored

Sometimes pets get bored with their food, especially if they’ve had a taste of people food, and would prefer your t-bone steak instead of their dry kibble. Sometimes changing their food, or even just warming their food, or topping their traditional kibble with wet food or broth can change things up enough to encourage your finicky pet to eat more regularly. 

Read our article on feeding a finicky pet for more information on switching your pet’s food.

      8. Bad Teeth 

As pet’s age, they may have issues with their teeth which may cause discomfort chewing food. Your vet should assess your pet’s teeth to ensure there are no issues that may be causing your pet to shun their food. 

Some older pets do better having the problematic teeth extracted, after which they should resume their normal feeding schedule and start eating again.

      9. Too much food

As pet’s age, they often do not require the same amount of food as they once did. Many pet parents overfeed their pets to begin with, which can often cause them to become overweight. Especially if you feed your pet treats throughout the day, they may become full more easily and just not be that ravenous at meal time. If you are feeding them more than they need, they may just pick at their food or not eat at all. 

One way to help is to limit treats throughout the day, exercise your pet often, and feed the appropriate amount of food based on your pet’s ideal weight. It is recommended that a dog should be fed approximately 1/3 cup for every 10 pounds over 100 pounds of body weight. It is recommended that most dogs be fed their daily allotment over two meals per day; once in the morning and once at night. 

dog food feeding chart

For cats it is recommended that a cat get between a half a cup and 3/4 cup for a 15 pound cat. Cats should also be fed 2 times per day, once in the morning and once at night. A larger cat may require more food and more feeding per day. 

 

cat feeding chart

 

      10. The pet feeding dish

Believe it or not, sometimes the feeding dish can be the issue. Many dogs and cats prefer to eat off the floor because they don’t like being obstructed by a traditional dog or cat bowl. A flat pet dish can often help a finicky pet because it changes the presentation of the food. Another consideration is an elevated food bowl. Some senior pets experience pain when stooping over to eat. An elevated bowl can often help older pets who have joint pain and discomfort while eating. 

Read more about feeding a finicky pet. 

How a Pet Stroller May Help Your Senior Dog or Cat

Traveling with a pet can be challenging with even the most well behaved, calm, able-bodied pets. But there are certain situations when getting from point A to point B with a pet becomes a challenge. Transporting your furry friend with a pet stroller can prove very useful depending on your needs and the needs of your pet.

A pet stroller may seem a little strange at first, especially because most people expect small children or babies in a stroller, but pet strollers for dogs and cats are becoming more popular and accepted because a stroller is often a much safer alternative to walking a leashed pet, especially in certain situations.

How do you know if a pet stroller is right for your pet? 

Here are some specific things to factor when considering a pet stroller:

Does your pet enjoy being with you wherever you go?

Some situations wouldn’t allow for a leashed pet to accompany you, like restaurants or malls. Even some parks are not pet friendly when it comes to leashed pets. But if your pet is contained within a stroller, then more places might allow your pet into their establishment. A pet stroller can help you enjoy certain locations without worrying about whether your leashed pet is allowed.

Is your pet older?

Senior pets (large dogs over age 6 and small dogs and cats over age 7) can tire easily which can make long walks too tiring for them. If they are too tired, they may need to be carried part of the way. A pet stroller can help keep stress off your arms and back, by allowing you to just push your furry friend.

Does your pet have an illness like arthritis, joint pain, or hip dysplasia?

Certain illnesses might make walking any sort of distance painful for your pet and would make enduring a long walk very difficult for your pet. A stroller can make traveling more comfortable for your pet.

Does your pet have an injury or are they recovering from surgery?

Surgery or an injury can take a lot out of your pet. Some surgeries or injuries can make walking painful, difficult or even impossible, especially if your pet has a splint or cast on his leg. A pet stroller can make traveling easier for your pet.

Are you concerned with leaving your pet alone at home?

Some pets may have seizures or require pet meds to be administered at certain times of the day, making staying at home alone while you are away a complicated situation. A pet stroller can make it easier for you to monitor and care for your pet while you are out.

Does your pet get along with people or other pets?

Some pets can become aggressive around people or other animals. Some just jump on people or have annoying habits or aggressive tendencies that might make traveling into crowded areas challenging. A pet stroller can help control your pet in crowded areas.

Does your pet get stressed in crowds?

Some pets are socially anxious, and crowds may cause them to bark or shake in fear. A stroller offers a level of containment, confinement and security for an anxious pet. A pet stroller can help your pet relax.

Is it too hot, cold or wet outside?

Most animals don’t do well in extreme weather conditions, especially if it is too hot, too cold or wet outside. A pet stroller can protect your pet from the elements.

Do you have physical limitations that make controlling your leashed pet challenging?

Some pet owners have physical limitations, whether due to age or illness that may cause them to have difficulties controlling a leashed pet. For instance, if you walk with a cane, or if your dog is a puller and you are of a smaller frame, it may be hard for you to control your pet on a walk. A stroller can help you feel more secure and in control when traveling with your pet.

Sometimes, it’s not about anything except pampering your furry friend. If your dog or cat enjoys being outdoors with you, rather than cooped up in the house, and if you think your pet would enjoy strolling along in a pet stroller, than that’s the only need to consider.

Which pet stroller to choose?

So you’ve decided to invest in a pet stroller to transport your pet. Which pet stroller is right for you? There are a wide variety of pet strollers: there are jogging strollers, ultra-light strollers, strollers for large dogs, strollers for multiple dogs, strollers for cats, strollers for multiple cats, strollers that are completely enclosed, and strollers that allow your pet to be partially exposed. A lot depends on the type of outings you plan on using the stroller for. Here are some things to factor when considering which stroller is right for you.

How large is your pet (or will your pet get)?

When purchasing a pet stroller, size matters. You want to be sure you select a model that will accommodate your pet at full maturity. If you aren’t sure how big your pet will get, consult with your vet for an estimated size and weight.

Will you be transporting more than one pet?

If you own more than one pet, and you will transport multiple pets in the stroller, then you need to factor the combined weight and size and ensure that the stroller is large enough to accommodate multiple pets comfortably.

What is your pet’s temperament?

Some pets are jumpers or chasers and can become easily distracted by anything around them. The last thing you would want is for your pet to escape from the stroller to chase something or someone. A stroller with a full enclosure will ensure that pets who like to jump or chase stay contained within the compartment. If your pet is pretty easy going, then you can get a partially enclosed stroller that features an opening for him to stick his head out of. Most of these strollers will allow you to tether your pet to the stroller so they can’t escape.

How do you plan to use the stroller?

Will you be using the stroller to go to the mall or a restaurant or will you be jogging with your pet? The type of activity should determine which stroller would best suit your needs. Ultra-light strollers are probably better for leisurely walking, where a jogging stroller might be better for higher intensity activity.

Will you be traveling at night?

Some strollers have reflective material that are better for traveling at nighttime. Reflectors can always be purchased separately if you find that you are using the stroller a lot at night, but if you anticipate that evening excursions are your thing, then a stroller with reflective material is a great feature to have.

What is the weather going to be like?

Some strollers are weather resistant and are designed to keep your pet dry when it rains or snows. If you live in a climate where it is really hot, then a stroller with a lot of venting is probably better. If you live in a climate that is really cold, then an enclosed stroller might be warmer. If you live in a climate where it rains or snows and you will be outside in those conditions, then a water resistant or waterproof stroller might be best. Most companies sell optional, removable waterproof covers, so if you find a stroller you like but its not waterproof, a cover may solve the problem.

Key features to look for:

When selecting a pet stroller, look for features that will not only benefit your pet, but you as well. Features like cup holders, purse compartments, a storage basket, easy front and rear entry, retractable rain hoods, easy locking entry, etc. are just a few of the features that will make your trips with your pet more enjoyable for him, and for you.

Pet strollers are designed specifically for pets, or multiple pets. Unlike baby strollers, they have certain features that you may not find with a stroller designed for a person. Some have built in harnesses or buckles to attach a leash or harness to your pet. Some also have waterproof liners in case of accidents. Venting is also typically very different for pet strollers, as is the opening that allows you to place your pet inside.

If you’d like to enjoy more outings with your cat or dog, then a pet stroller may be something to consider.  

Content provided in collaboration with the Elderly Pet Organization and Engaging Pet Products – An Engaged Pet is a Happy Pet.

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet.

Is Raw Food Appropriate for a Diabetic Cat

Senior cats can become very finicky as they age and if they develop an illness like diabetes, it can become critical for them to eat regular meals. A diabetic cat or a senior cat  that won’t eat can become very stressful and concerning for pet parents. Specially formulated diets can sometimes help feed even the most finicky senior pets. 

Specially formulated cat food uses your cat’s unique profile details and a proprietary algorithm to determine a custom meal plan that offers optimal calorie intake for healthy weight. 

Pre-portioned servings based on your cat’s weight and size eliminate the guesswork, allowing you to feed your cat once in the morning and once in the evening. For those cats taking insulin, these meals are critical and specialty cat food can really help take some of the guesswork out of feeding your finicky diabetic cat. 

Balanced nutrition that is 100% US sourced and specific to your cat ensures that your pet gets natural ingredients with no fillers or artificial ingredients. Personalized plans meet your cat’s individual needs taking into account: breed, age, allergies, activity level, specific conditions and much more.

If you are considering an alternative to traditional store bought cat food because your diabetic cat simply won’t eat regularly, a specially formulated cat food may help end mealtime frustration. Keep in mind that low carbohydrate, high protein wet food is typically better for diabetic cats. 

A popular option for diabetic cats is a raw diet. Raw diets by design are lower in carbs and higher in protein, which can help regulate sugar levels in diabetic animals. Below are two raw diets that may be worth considering.

Below are a few examples of raw pet food available for senior cats. We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. 

Cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they have nutritional requirements that can only be met with a diet based almost entirely on animal tissue. This is why this cat food is 100% real meat (chicken, turkey, or lamb) and contains no animal by-products or fillers.

This grain-free meal provides complete and balanced nutrition and helps to ensure your cat lives a long and healthy life. All the turkey, chicken, and lamb in this food is pasture-raised and free-roaming (cage free), with no added antibiotics, steroids or artificial hormones.

 Epigen

This raw cat food line is designed and formulated in accordance with nature. Unrivaled by any other raw cat foods available, these diets represent the least compromise from the natural raw feline diet. These products are shelf stable and safe, superior to raw frozen diets, and are a necessary component of any healthy feeding regimen.

This raw cat food offers raw cat food that can help alleviate allergies, give your cat more energy and shinier coat and improve digestion. Their raw diet is all protein, all organic, all natural, balanced nutrition with no growth hormones, no antibiotics, no preservatives, no fillers, corn, grains or rice and no animal byproducts. 

Why a Flat Feeding Plate is Better for Finicky Senior Pets

As pets age, many become finicky eaters who can make meal time frustrating for pet parents. Pet owners often think that switching to senior pet food, adding wet food, broth, food toppers or sprays, or some other tactic will help their senior pet eat better. However, in some cases, the food is not the issue. Rather, it is the pet feeding dish that causes distress for many older pets. 

Cats and dogs are domesticated wild animals whose survival depends on their awareness of their surroundings, especially when they are eating. A traditional feeding bowl obstructs an animal’s vision, and for cats can cause whisker stress especially if a pet’s whiskers, tags, or bowl height prevent them from putting their face in the bowl to eat. 

Some senior pets simply prefer to eat off the ground, which is how all pets eat in the wild. A traditional bowl goes against their natural animal instinct and some pets, especially senior pets who may have a diminished appetite, simply refuse to eat.  This can be especially distressful if you have an insulin dependent senior pet who needs to eat at regular intervals in order to receive his medication.

Another common issue often seen with older, finicky pets is that they prefer to be hand fed, or they will only eat treats, but they refuse food from their bowl. This is often another indication that the pet prefers eating from the floor, and another perspective on why a flat plate may be a solution. 

A flat feeding plate is the closest thing to a pet eating off the floor without having to resort to disgusting paper plates or even worse, eating off the dirty floor. A flat plate can also keep food in the dish, rather than dumping it all over the floor and making a mess everywhere. 
 

A flat plate is closer to the ground, which for smaller dogs and cats, is a more natural feeding position. A flat plate is not obstructive so your pet can see what is around him while he eats, and pet tags won’t hit the rim of a flat plate when pets are eating. Many animals are alarmed and become afraid of their feeding bowl because of the noise their tag makes when it hits the rim of the bowl. 

Another consideration when feeding senior pets is the material a feeding dish is made of. A BPA free plate won’t absorb bacteria the way other materials, like plastic and silicone can. Stainless steel dishes can be radioactive. 

A good flat plate should be made of high quality materials and be dishwasher as well as microwave safe. 

Should you have any questions about your finicky senior pet not eating at mealtime, it is important to consult your vet with any concerns you may have. If illness is not the issue, then switching to a flat plate might be the answer. 

Below are two examples of dogs who would not eat before switching to a flat plate.

Content provided in collaboration with the Elderly Pet Organization and The Pet Plate Complete Feeding System for Finicky Furry Friends.

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet. 

Read More about feeding senior pets.

Personalized Pet Gifts

A pet’s friendship is one of nature’s many gifts to us. As pet’s age, we start to realize they may not always be with us. A great way to honor the special bond you share with your beloved pet, or the beloved pet of a family member or friend, is with a personalized pet product with your adorable pet’s face on it. 

Blankets also make a great gift for senior dogs or cats who may have joint pain, hip dysplasia or sores, warts, masses or growths. A soft blanket can help alleviate some of the pressure due to these common ailments many senior pets have. 

A custom designed blanket featuring your dog, cat, ferret, bunny or any animal you adore can be personalized just for you. Once your selection is approved, your order is processed and your blanket will arrive in no time at all. 

Another idea is a personalized stuffed animal replica of your pet. There are custom stuffed animals, personalized pet pillows and custom pet socks – all customized with your furry friend’s photo. 

A personalized pet gift makes a great gift for holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, memorials, or for any occasion where pets are an important part of someone’s life. 

Personalized pet gifts are truly one-of-a kind gifts and are very special to the person receiving them. If you’re scratching your head trying to figure out what to get that hard-to-buy for person in your life, and if they are an avid animal lover who adores their pets, a personalized pet blanket, pillow, stuffed animal, or canvas of their furry friend makes a great gift. 

We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. 

 

WoofBlankets

Your dog deserves this!

These blankets are oversized; not your typical throw blanket that barely covers you. And the quality of the blankets is super soft, ultra plush, super cozy throw blanket for snuggling on the couch, bed or anywhere you want to feel a great big hug from your furry friend. The artwork is exceptional and true to the image supplied in the proof – if not better!

Petsies

What Type of Dog Food Is Appropriate for Diabetic Dog

Senior dogs can become very finicky as they age and if they develop an illness like diabetes, it can become critical for them to eat regular meals. A diabetic dog or a senior dog that won’t eat can become very stressful and concerning for pet parents. Specially formulated diets can sometimes help feed even the most finicky senior pets. 

Specially formulated dog food uses your dog’s unique profile details and a proprietary algorithm to determine a custom meal plan that offers optimal calorie intake for healthy weight. 

Crafted Kibble offers a fully customized, subscription-based dog food delivery service that gives your pet flavorful, nutrient-filled meals that are already pre-portioned out just for them. The also offer a grain-free option which is lower in carbs, and ideal for dogs that require lower carb intake. 

Pre-portioned servings based on your dog’s weight and size eliminate the guesswork, allowing you to feed your dog once in the morning and once in the evening. For those dogs taking insulin, these meals are critical and this dog food can really help take some of the guesswork out of feeding your finicky diabetic dog. 

Balanced nutrition that is 100% US sourced and specific to your dog ensures that your pet gets natural ingredients with no fillers or artificial ingredients. Personalized plans meet your dog’s individual needs taking into account: breed, age, allergies, activity level, specific conditions and much more.

These specially formulated diets are vet crafted and exceed industry standards (AAFCO).

According to Trustpilot, an independent review site, Craftedkibble has an excellent consumer rating, with over 98% of reviewers rating their dog food as excellent or great. 

If you are considering an alternative to traditional store bought dog food because your diabetic dog simply won’t eat regularly, a specially formulated dog food may help end mealtime frustration. 

Below are a few examples of pet food you might consider for senior dogs with diabetes. We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult with your vet before switching your pet’s food.

 

This dog food can be specially formulated for a diabetic dog or a senior dog with other ailments. If your finicky senior dog is refusing to eat at meal times, and you have already changed their feeding dish, then switching to a different dog food might be worth a shot. 

There are other dog foods that are specially formulated for diabetic dogs as well such as keto diets and raw diets. 

Keto diets are low carb diets, and low carb diets are better for people with diabetes. The same is true for diabetic dogs. Limiting carbs can help improve canine health. A keto diet can burn fat instead of storing it, optimize blood sugar levels, build strong, lean muscles, and reduce itching and inflammation. 

This is a low-carb kibble dog food with 90% fewer carbs than other ultra premium kibbles. Features more animal protein per serving than most raw diets at a fraction of the cost, and offers a 30 day money back guarantee. It is delivered to your door and is based on your dog’s unique characteristics. It is designed to burn fat instead of storing it, optimize blood sugar levels, build strong, lean muscles and reduce itching and inflammation. 

Another option for diabetic dogs is a raw diet. Raw diets by design are lower in carbs and higher in protein, which can help regulate sugar levels in diabetic animals. Below are two raw diets that may be worth considering.

This raw dog food is naturally lower in carbs than traditional kibble. Many vets recommend raw diets, especially for diabetic pets, but many homemade diets are deficient in antioxidants, lack the correct amounts of trace minerals and vitamins and or lack the right fatty acid balance. These meals are specially formulated to contain everything your pet needs. 

RAW WILD

This dog food is also raw dog food that can help alleviate allergies, give your dog more energy and shinier coat and improve digestion. Their raw diet is all protein, all organic, all natural, balanced nutrition with no growth hormones, no antibiotics, no preservatives, no fillers, corn, grains or rice and no animal byproducts. 

Top Ten Foods You Should Not Feed Your Senior Pet

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, cats and small dogs are considered seniors at age 7; large dogs are considered seniors at age 5 or 6. Owners should be careful about many people foods they may feed to their pet, regardless of their age. However, senior pets are even more at risk of serious illness or death from foods that may be toxic to them. It’s not enough to be careful for items in their natural state, it is also extremely important that you not feed your dog or cat anything that CONTAINS any of these items as well. Even a small amount of one of these foods can make your pet very sick. 

As a general rule, you should not feed your pet food that is intended for people. If your pet accidentally eats one of these items or something containing one of these items, it is important that you monitor your pet closely for the following symptoms. 

Chocolate

Chocolate can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, high heart rate, tremors, seizures and even death. 

Coffee

Coffee can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, high heart rate, tremors, seizures and even death. 

Alcohol

Alcohol can cause vomiting, drunkenness, coma and death.

Avocado

Avocado can be fatal to birds and rabbits. It can cause vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. 

Macadamia Nuts

Macadamia nuts can cause temporary hind leg weakness, paralysis and tremors in dogs.

Grapes / Raisins

Grapes or raisins can cause kidney failure in dogs. 

Bread Dough / Raw Yeast

Bread dough or raw yeast can cause bloat and drunkenness.  

Candy, Gum & Peanut Butter with Xylitol

Candy, gum and peanut butter that contain Xylitol can cause seizures and liver failure in dogs.

Garlic

Garlic can cause vomiting and red blood cell damage.

Onions

Onions can cause vomiting and red blood cell damage.

It is extremely important that you not feed your pet any of these food items, and it is especially important that you read ingredient labels or check the product for any of the items on this list. Foods like pizza, pasta sauce, gravies, stews, etc. may contain one or more of these ingredients and should not be fed to your pet. 

If you think your pet has ingested something toxic, contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435.

How to Detect Urinary Issues in Senior Cats

A cat is considered a senior cat at age 7 and oftentimes, senior cats develop urinary tract issues. Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease is not merely one problem, but a collection of clinical symptoms that may have more than one possible cause. Cats with FLUTD can experience painful urination, bloody urine and frequent licking of the urinary opening. Causes can include bladder stones, urinary tract blockage, infection or cancer. Cystitis or inflammation of the bladder is the most common diagnosis.

Some of the symptoms of lower urinary tract problems include: 

  • Inability to urinate or only passing a small amount of urine
  • Bloody or cloudy urine
  • Loss of bladder control, dribbling urine
  • Increased frequency of urination or visits to the litter box
  • Straining and or crying when passing urine
  • Prolonged squatting in the litter box
  • Fear or avoidance of the litter box
  • Soiling in inappropriate places
  • Constant licking of urinary opening
  • Strong odor of ammonia in urine
  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting
  • Increased water consumption
  • Hard, distended abdomen

If you suspect that your cat has a urinary tract issue, it is important that she is seen by her vet as quickly as possible. Untreated urinary problems can cause partial or complete obstruction of the urethra, preventing the cat from urinating. This is a medical emergency that can very quickly lead to kidney failure and or rupture of the bladder, which can prove fatal if the obstruction is not relieved right away.

One way to regularly monitor your cat’s urinary health and help you determine if their is a problem, aside from the symptoms discuss previously, is to consider health monitoring cat litter for your senior pet. A relatively new concept, health monitoring cat litter can alert you to issues before your cat show’s outward symptoms. 

What is Health Monitoring Cat Litter?

  • it is a color-changing, health-monitoring cat litter  
  • it is dedicated to improving and monitoring the health and wellness of cats, no matter their breed or age
  • super porous crystals absorb and then eliminate moisture which means you do not need to keep replenishing your litter throughout the month. 
  • health monitoring cat litter eliminates moisture so you only need to scoop the poop!

How Health Monitoring Cat Litter is especially suited for aging pets?

Senior cats are notorious for hiding illnesses, so it’s often hard to tell if they are sick or in pain. Health monitoring litter makes it easier for you to know if your cat is experiencing a potential health issue before urgent medical care is needed, saving you money, stress and potentially your cat’s life. Potential health issues that can be associated with color change include:

  • BLUE OR DARK GREEN: Certain types of urinary tract infections. High urinary pH can lead to bladder crystal and stone formation. (Alkalinity)
  • ORANGE: Metabolic acidosis & kidney tubular acidosis. Low urinary pH can lead to Calcium Oxalate. (Acidity)
  • RED: Bladder inflammation, bladder Stones, urinary tract infection. (Blood)

Health monitoring cat litter not only monitors your cat’s health, and can detect issues before your cat shows outward symptoms, but it is odorless and scentless. When in contact with urine, it traps the odor and then eliminates the moisture. 

 

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult with your vet to rule out medical issues that can be monitored and diagnosed by your vet. 

How Pet Stairs and Steps May Help Your Pet Onto Furniture

It is not uncommon for senior pets (large dogs over age 6 and small dogs and cats over age 7) to have difficulty accessing high places, such as the bed, couch, or other higher surface in and around your home.  Millions of pets are injured every year attempting to jump up on or get up on higher surfaces, sometimes breaking a leg or severely injuring a tendon or joint. Senior pets often suffer from joint injuries or illnesses such as hip dysplasia, arthritis, torn ACL or other ailments, making jumping almost impossible for them. What’s more frustrating, is how heartbreaking it is to see an older dog or an injured dog attempt something he could once do, only to discover that he can no longer get on the surface he is attempting to get on.

Pet steps and stairs designed specifically for pets can help your pet regain his confidence and bring him the joy of being on his beloved surface. Pet steps and stairs are typically designed to be used at home or in a vehicle and come in a wide variety of styles and sizes. Steps and stairs are like regular stairs, although some have a shorter rise for smaller dogs and are designed to make it easier for your pet to get from point A to point B.

Pet steps and stairs can make life easier for your pet because they can provide an easier way for them to get where they want to go, or where you need them to go. This is especially true for larger dogs who may weigh too much for you to lift. Pet steps and stairs can help give your older pet confidence and can cause less stress for smaller pets who often take a big jump to get off and on some surfaces.

How do you know if pet steps and stairs are right for your pet? 

Here are some specific things to factor when considering pet steps and stairs:

Does your pet enjoy being on high surfaces he cannot reach on his own?

Some pets enjoy sitting on the couch during the day while they wait for their family to get home from work or school. It can be dangerous for a pet to attempt to jump onto or off the couch without help, especially if no one is home to assist them. Pet stairs and steps can help you pet get where they want to go more easily.

Is your pet older?

Senior pets (large dogs over age 6 and small dogs and cats over age 7) may not be able to jump like they once did. Pet steps and stairs can help them navigate higher places without worrying they may injure themselves.

Does your pet have an illness like arthritis, joint pain, or hip dysplasia?

Certain illnesses might make jumping up on furniture painful for your pet. Pet steps and stairs can make getting on and off furniture more comfortable for your pet.

Does your pet have an injury or are they recovering from surgery?

Surgery or an injury can take a lot out of your pet. Some surgeries or injuries can make jumping painful, difficult or even impossible, especially if your pet has a splint or cast on his leg. Pet steps and stairs can make getting up on higher surfaces easier for your pet.

Do you have physical limitations that make helping your pet into the car challenging?

Some pet owners have physical limitations, whether due to age or illness that may cause them to have difficulties lifting a pet. For instance, if you have a bad back, or if your dog is a too heavy for you to lift, it may be hard for you to lift your pet onto the bed. Pet steps and stairs can help ensure you won’t injure yourself whenever you want to take a nap with your pet.

Sometimes, it’s not about anything except pampering your furry friend. If your dog or cat enjoys being with you when you sleep and if you think your pet would enjoy getting on and off the bed on his own, then steps and stairs may be ideal for you and your pet.

You should consult with your vet when considering steps and stairs for your senior pet because every situation is different and what may be right for one pet, may not be right for another pet.

Which pet steps and stairs to choose?

So, you’ve decided to invest in pet steps or stairs to help your pet get onto furniture. Which pet steps and stairs are right for you? There are a wide variety of pet steps and stairs: Some are made of wood, plastic or high-density foam. Some are designed specifically for smaller pets, while others are designed for larger pets. Some are carpeted or have nonskid surfaces. Some are lightweight and easy to tote from room to room. Some are temporary and can fold out of the way; others are more permanent and can be kept in a fixed location. Here are some things to factor when considering which pet steps or stairs are right for you.

How large is your pet (or will your pet get)?

When purchasing a pet steps and stairs, size matters. You want to be sure you select a model that will accommodate your pet at full maturity. If you aren’t sure how big your pet will get, consult with your vet for an estimated size and weight.

How do you plan to use the steps and stairs?

Will you be using the steps and stairs to help your pet get on the bed or the couch? If you will be using the steps near the bed, consider how your pet typically would access the furniture and place the steps near where he is accustomed to getting onto the furniture.

Will the pet steps and stairs fit in your space?

Steps and stairs come in different sizes, styles and heights. It’s a good idea to select a steps and stairs that will not only fit the space where you plan to use it, but also fit the size of your pet. It’s important to measure the space and choose steps that will not be in the way of other pets or visitors.

How to train your pet to use a steps and stairs?

A pet steps and stairs are designed to be similar to household stairs. Some dogs may be intimidated at first and will require some training, patience and praise to properly teach your pet to use the steps and stairs. Remember, he may be accustomed to jumping on the furniture, so the steps and stairs may initially be an obstacle.

Some pets are afraid of steps and stairs initially, but with proper training and guidance, and plenty of treats, your pet may learn to love his new way to access the furniture. The best way to train a pet is to guide them up the steps and stairs with a toy or a treat. Most dogs learn to use steps and stairs pretty quickly especially going up the steps and stairs. Going down the steps and stairs can take more time, patience and practice. The tendency will be for them to jump off the surface and completely bypass the steps and stairs. Again, training and patience are key to teaching your dog the proper method for using the steps and stairs, especially if they are accustomed to jumping.

Key features to look for:

When selecting a pet steps and stairs, look for features that will not only benefit your pet, but you and your lifestyle as well. Steps and stairs can coordinate with your home décor and some steps and stairs might be easier on your pet’s joints than others.

Pet steps and stairs are designed specifically for pets and they are not designed to be used by a person. Some are made of wood; others are made of plastic or foam. Some are lightweight and very easy to move from room to room; others are heavier or designed for higher surfaces. Some are designed for small dogs and cats; others are made specifically for large dogs.

If you’d like to help your pet get where he wants to go more easily, then a pet steps and stairs may be something to consider.  

Content provided in collaboration with the Elderly Pet Organization and Engaging Pet Products – An Engaged Pet is a Happy Pet.

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet.

 

How Joint Supplements May Help Senior Dogs

Joint pain is often caused by bone-on-bone wear and tear to a joint. If the fluid and cushion between joints has worn, and bone is rubbing on bone, this can cause joint pain in your senior pet. Once the cushioning is worn, there is very little that can be done to restore the cushioning. Some pet medications and joint supplements can alleviate the symptoms of joint pain and arthritis in senior dogs, but there is no medication or supplement that can fully restore the cushion. Pain management is typically the course of treatment your vet may prescribe for your senior pet.  

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, supplements are not recommended for your senior pet unless specifically prescribed by your veterinarian. If your pet is eating a complete and balanced commercially available pet food, supplementation may not be necessary. 

That being said, if your senior pet suffers with joint pain or arthritis, supplements that are prescribed by your vet may be helpful in decreasing your pet’s discomfort and increase their joint mobility.

It is vitally important that you discuss any pain management and treatment with your vet. Supplements are not regulated and may contain ingredients that can potentially be harmful to your pet, especially if they are taken in conjunction with other medications.

Also, supplements do not provide instant results. Oftentimes, supplements can take up to 4-6 weeks before your pet exhibits relief. If your dog is in pain or showing signs of distress, he should be seen by his vet immediately. Your vet may prescribe an NSAID (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) and your vet may also recommend a joint supplement. Keep in mind, NSAID’s that would be prescribed for a dog are NOT the same as an NSAID that would be prescribed for a human, and some of these drugs (including ibuprofen and acetaminophen) can be toxic for pets. 

If your vet has authorized the use of joint supplements for your senior pet, there are several that may be helpful to your pet. Some studies suggest that Glucosamine and Chondroitin may help alleviate joint pain symptoms and it is very likely if your vet suggests a supplement, that it may contain one or both of these ingredients, depending on your pet’s unique situation. 

Joint supplements typically come in a pill or chewable form.  Some joint supplements can cause diarrhea and vomiting. Be sure to read the ingredients and discuss any supplements with your vet before purchasing, especially if your pet has allergies or if your pet is taking any other medications. 

We do not endorse or promote any products on our website. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult with your vet before treating dog joint issues to rule out medical issues that can be treated by your vet. 

How a Pet Car Booster Seat Can Keep Your Cat or Dog Safe When You Travel

Traveling with a pet can be challenging with even the most well behaved, calm, able-bodied pets. But there are certain situations when getting from point A to point B with a pet becomes a challenge. Transporting your furry friend with a booster seat can prove very useful depending on your needs and the needs of your pet. A car booster seat provides a safe place for your pet to ride in the car and also provides enough lift to allow him to see out the window when you travel. Car booster seats are typically designed for small to medium sized dogs. For a large dog, you may not be able to find a car seat large enough for your pet; in which case a harness or tether can be used to keep your pet secure in the car.

A pet booster seat may seem a little strange at first, especially because most people expect small children or babies in a booster seat, but pet car seats or booster seats for dogs and cats are becoming more popular and accepted because a car seat is often a much safer alternative to traveling with an unleashed pet, especially in certain situations.

How do you know if a pet car seat is right for your pet? 

Here are some specific things to factor when considering a pet car seat or booster seat:

Are you concerned with your pet’s safety when traveling in the car?

Most vehicles were not designed with pets in mind. Most cars do not offer any features that would secure a pet while traveling. It really is up to pet owners to do their due diligence to ensure that their pet is as safe as possible when traveling in a car. A pet car seat or booster seat can help ensure that your pet is traveling as safely as possible.

Does your pet distract you when you are driving?

Some pets cannot behave when traveling in the car. They often jump around or cause other distractions that can be dangerous for drivers. Distracted driving is one of the leading causes of car accidents, and a loose pet who cannot behave can be very distracting for drivers. A car seat or booster seat can help keep your pet secured in their seat so they are unable to jump around and distract you while driving.

Does your pet enjoy looking out the window when you travel by car?

Some pets are just too small to look out the window unless they are sitting in your lap. Traveling with a pet who is in your lap is unsafe not only for you, where you can be easily distracted, but also for your pet, especially if you need to stop short. A booster car seat can be secured in the car with a standard seat belt and is designed to boost your pet high enough to see out the window as you travel. A booster car seat can help keep you and your pet safe while you travel.

Are you concerned with leaving your pet alone at home?

Some pets may have seizures or require frequent medications administered at certain times of the day, making staying at home alone while you are away a complicated situation. A pet car seat, especially one that converts to a carrier, can make it easier for you to monitor and care for your pet while you are out.

Will you be traveling by car and also plane, bus or train?

If you are planning on taking your furry friend on car rides, but you also need to transport her onto a plane, bus or train, several car booster seats can also be used as a pet carrier. Check with the manufacturer to be sure the booster car seat carrier is airline approved. As of this writing the recommended maximum dimensions for a soft sided kennel or carrier is 18“ long x 11” wide x 11” high. Soft sided carriers can be slightly larger because they are collapsible and able to fit underneath the seat without blocking the aisle.

Sometimes, it’s not about anything except keeping your furry friend safe. If your dog or cat enjoys traveling with you, rather than cooped up in the house, and if you think your pet would enjoy riding in a booster car seat, then that’s the only need to consider.

Which pet car seat to choose?

So you’ve decided to invest in a pet car seat to transport your pet. Which pet car seat is right for you? There are a wide variety of pet car seats: Here are some things to factor when considering which stroller is right for you.

How large is your pet (or will your pet get)?

When purchasing a pet car seat, size matters. You want to be sure you select a model that will accommodate your pet at full maturity. If you aren’t sure how big your pet will get, consult with your vet for an estimated size and weight.

Will you be transporting more than one pet?

If you own more than one pet, and you will transport multiple pets in the car seat, then you need to factor the combined weight and size and ensure that the car seat is large enough to accommodate multiple pets comfortably. A bucket seat booster is designed to be large enough for two small pets.

Do you need it to be high enough for your pet to have a view?

Not all car seats are booster seats; some are purely used to keep your pet secure in the vehicle. A booster seat will not only keep your pet safe but can add up to 10 inches of height in order to give them a clear view out the window. A car booster seat can help keep your pet calm if they are distracted by looking out the window.

How do you plan to use the car seat?

Will you be using the car seat to go from the car to the vet or a friend’s house? Do you need to keep your pet secure not only in the car, but after the car ride? A booster travel system is a carrier that converts to a booster seat in the car, attaches to a base, and can be easily removed to take your pet from the car to the store or vet with ease.

Key features to look for:

When selecting a pet car booster seat, look for features that will not only benefit your pet, but you as well. Some car booster seats fit both front and back seat. Some are machine washable. Some allow your pet to see out the window. Some include a built in security leash or tether. Some feature soft padding or adjustable straps. Some can double as an airline approved carrier or regular pet carrier.

Pet car seats are designed specifically for pets, or multiple pets. Unlike child car seats, they have certain features that you may not find with a car seat designed for a person. Some have built in harnesses or buckles to attach a leash or harness to your pet. Some also have waterproof liners in case of accidents. Venting is also typically very different for pet car seats, as is the opening that allows you to place your pet inside.

If you’d like to enjoy more outings with your cat or dog, then a pet car booster seat may be something to consider.  

Content provided in collaboration with the Elderly Pet Organization and Engaging Pet Products – An Engaged Pet is a Happy Pet.

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet.

Help for Senior Pets with Allergies

Pets can develop allergies at any stage of life, but allergies in elderly pets can be very frustrating, not only for pet parents but also for pets. Pets with allergies are often itchy and uncomfortable and can cause skin irritations that need to be addressed by a vet.

The good news is, there are new medications available to help treat pet allergies that can alleviate most if not all symptoms, helping your elderly pet live more comfortably. There are also more holistic options available for treating a senior pet who is suffering from allergies, including hypoallergenic foods, shampoos and conditioners made for sensitive skin, and more.

The first thing you should do if you see your pet constantly scratching, licking his paws, or gnawing at his fur, is to talk with your vet especially if you notice excessive licking, scratching or general discomfort. If allergies are diagnosed, there are medications, as well as holistic treatments that can help.

If your elderly pet is suffering from allergies, there are several steps you can take to help your senior pet.

  1. Talk with your vet to determine if allergies is the actual cause of your pet’s discomfort and discuss possible treatment options that may help.
  2. Consider switching your pet’s diet. Some vets recommend home cooked diets to help control allergies, but you should work with your vet before switching your pet’s food. You can also work with a vet nutritional specialist to determine what foods may help reduce symptoms.
  3. Bathe your pet more regularly and consider a hypo allergenic shampoo. Pets who have allergies tend to flare up the more they are exposed to allergens. Bathing helps remove some of the allergens and can reduce symptoms. Also, wiping your pet’s paws with hypoallergenic towelettes can also reduce allergy symptoms.
  4. Salmon oil may help some pets alleviate dry and itchy skin
  5. Keep your home free of allergy triggers. Like people, pets are susceptible to household allergies like dust and mold. Cleaning your home regularly can help reduce allergens and help improve your pets symptoms. A cool mist humidifier can also put moisture in the air during dry weather and can help relieve dry, itchy skin.

If you suspect that your elderly pet has allergies, do what you can to help but be sure to speak with your vet to determine if allergies are the true cause of your pet’s discomfort. Rest assured, with the proper care and treatment, your furry friend should feel better in no time.

Allergy medications can be expensive and pet insurance can help offset the cost of allergy medications that your vet may recommend.

We highly recommend pet insurance for senior pets. It’s important that you purchase pet insurance before your pet is diagnosed with a particular illness because most pet insurance will not cover a pet with a pre-existing medical condition. Visit our pet insurance facts page for more information about pet insurance.

Below are a few examples of options you might consider for senior dogs with allergies. We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult with your vet before using any products or switching your pet’s food.

 

Hypoallergenic dog food is a good option for senior dogs with allergies. Watch for dog foods that contain corn, wheat or soy which can be allergy triggers for many senior pets. 

For cat’s with sensitive skin and stomach issues, a hypoallergenic cat food developed specifically for cat’s with sensitivities and allergies is a good option to consider for your senior cat. 

A hypoallergenic pet shampoo should treat yeast infections, ringworm, pyoderma and skin allergies, plus a good shampoo also deodorizes and gently cleanses skin. 

Hypoallergenic wipes developed for cats or dogs with sensitive skin can be used in between washing to help remove dust, dander or dirt that can irritate your pet’s skin.

Salmon oil is a natural fish oil additive supplement that supports the skin, coat, hips, joints, heart and immune system. Developed for cats and dogs to help alleviate dry skin, dull shedding coat, hot spots, or itching and irritation. 

This vacuum is features an anti allergen complete seal technology plus HEPA filter to trap 99.9% of dust and allergens inside the vacuum. 

A cool mist humidifier safely moisturizes the dry air in your room letting you breathe easy and moisturizes skin to alleviate discomfort.