Personalized Pet Gifts

A pet’s friendship is one of nature’s many gifts to us. As pet’s age, we start to realize they may not always be with us. A great way to honor the special bond you share with your beloved pet, or the beloved pet of a family member or friend, is with a personalized pet product with your adorable pet’s face on it. 

Blankets also make a great gift for senior dogs or cats who may have joint pain, hip dysplasia or sores, warts, masses or growths. A soft blanket can help alleviate some of the pressure due to these common ailments many senior pets have. 

A custom designed blanket featuring your dog, cat, ferret, bunny or any animal you adore can be personalized just for you. Once your selection is approved, your order is processed and your blanket will arrive in no time at all. 

Another idea is a personalized stuffed animal replica of your pet. There are custom stuffed animals, personalized pet pillows and custom pet socks – all customized with your furry friend’s photo. 

A personalized pet gift makes a great gift for holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, memorials, or for any occasion where pets are an important part of someone’s life. 

Personalized pet gifts are truly one-of-a kind gifts and are very special to the person receiving them. If you’re scratching your head trying to figure out what to get that hard-to-buy for person in your life, and if they are an avid animal lover who adores their pets, a personalized pet blanket, pillow, stuffed animal, or canvas of their furry friend makes a great gift. 

We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. 

 

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Petsies

Why a Flat Feeding Plate is Better for Finicky Senior Pets

As pets age, many become finicky eaters who can make meal time frustrating for pet parents. Pet owners often think that switching to senior pet food, adding wet food, broth, food toppers or sprays, or some other tactic will help their senior pet eat better. However, in some cases, the food is not the issue. Rather, it is the pet feeding dish that causes distress for many older pets. 

Cats and dogs are domesticated wild animals whose survival depends on their awareness of their surroundings, especially when they are eating. A traditional feeding bowl obstructs an animal’s vision, and for cats can cause whisker stress especially if a pet’s whiskers, tags, or bowl height prevent them from putting their face in the bowl to eat. 

Some senior pets simply prefer to eat off the ground, which is how all pets eat in the wild. A traditional bowl goes against their natural animal instinct and some pets, especially senior pets who may have a diminished appetite, simply refuse to eat.  This can be especially distressful if you have an insulin dependent senior pet who needs to eat at regular intervals in order to receive his medication.

A flat feeding plate is the closest thing to a pet eating off the floor without having to resort to disgusting paper plates or even worse, eating off the dirty floor. A flat plate can also keep food in the dish, rather than dumping it all over the floor and making a mess everywhere. 

A flat plate is closer to the ground, which for smaller dogs and cats, is a more natural feeding position. A flat plate is not obstructive so your pet can see what is around him while he eats, and pet tags won’t hit the rim of a flat plate when pets are eating. Many animals are alarmed and become afraid of their feeding bowl because of the noise their tag makes when it hits the rim of the bowl. 

Another consideration when feeding senior pets is the material a feeding dish is made of. A BPA free plate won’t absorb bacteria the way other materials, like plastic and silicone can. Stainless steel dishes can be radioactive. 

A good flat plate should be made of high quality materials and be dishwasher as well as microwave safe. 

Should you have any questions about your finicky senior pet not eating at mealtime, it is important to consult your vet with any concerns you may have. If illness is not the issue, then switching to a flat plate might be the answer. 

Content provided in collaboration with the Elderly Pet Organization and The Pet Plate Complete Feeding System for Finicky Furry Friends.

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet. 

Senior Pet Food for Elderly Pets

As your pet ages, you may find that their eagerness to eat diminishes or if they develop an illness, you may be concerned if their diet is helping to manage the disease. However, deciding on the “best” diet for an older dog or cat can be a difficult decision; there is no one best diet for every older animal. The aging process depends on a variety of factors including breed, genetics, and health problems. Just because a food is marketed for older animals or because your pet reaches a certain age, doesn’t necessarily mean that it is time to switch to senior cat or dog food.

Although most pets are considered senior pets at age 7, not all pets will exhibit signs of aging like lower energy and the tendency to gain fat and lose muscle. Immune function and kidney function may also decline with age, although the degree to which this occurs will depend on the individual animal.Although your pet may be considered an older pet, adjustment of his diet may or may not be necessary or even desirable in older animals. Many older dogs and cats can continue to eat a good quality commercial adult diet and do not need to be changed to a different diet, especially if they are still eating well and have no health problems.

Other aging dogs and cats, however, may benefit from a switch to a “senior” diet. It is important to understand that there is no legal definition for “senior” foods – diets marketed as senior diets need to follow the same legal guidelines as diets for adult pets. Some foods will meet the needs of an individual animal better than others.

Some of the nutrients that may need to be adjusted as a pet ages (but are not necessarily modified in individual senior diets) include the following:

  1. Protein: There is no evidence that a diet low in protein or high in protein is optimal for an aging pet. The subject is still quite controversial and unless your vet suggests otherwise, no adjustment to the amount of protein your pet gets is advised.
  1. Phosphorus: Lowering dietary phosphorus has been shown to be beneficial in pets with kidney disease, but it is not known whether low dietary phosphorus can reduce the risk of development of kidney disease. It is important to work with your veterinarian to determine how much phosphorus is recommended for your pet.
  1. Sodium: Sodium levels vary widely in senior diets. Restricting dietary sodium is unnecessary for the general population of older dogs and cats, but may be recommended if heart disease, high blood pressure, or kidney disease are present.
  1. Calories: Older pets may tend to gain weight as they age (although some lose weight) and calorie consumption may be a concern if either situation exists. Extra pounds around the middle can cause or worsen other diseases, such as diabetes or arthritis. The calories in commercial senior diets for dogs and cats vary widely so you should work with your veterinarian to carefully select the most appropriate diet for your senior pet to maintain his or her optimal body weight.
  1. Fiber: Increased fiber intake may be useful for dogs and cats that have certain intestinal issues, but high fiber foods are not right for all older animals. For example, many of the commercial high fiber diets would not be ideal for animals that have difficulty maintaining weight since these diets are typically low in calories. It is important to consult with your vet if your pet has difficulty maintaining weight.
  1. Supplemental vitamins and minerals: If you’re feeding your pet a good quality commercial food, supplementation is typically not unnecessary. While some supplements may be helpful if your pet has certain illnesses, it is important to note that supplements are regulated very differently from drugs and there may be  concerns with safety, effectiveness and quality control. It is important to discuss any supplements you are considering for your pet with your vet because many have side effects and possible interactions with medications.

If your senior dog or cat is healthy, in good body condition, and eating a good quality nutritionally balanced diet, there is no reason to change foods. However, if your pet has developed arthritis, diabetes, cancer, dental problems, heart disease, or kidney disease, dietary adjustments may help improve symptoms or even slow progression of the disease.

There are many good quality commercial diets available today, and their variable nutrient content provides many choices for optimizing the health of your elderly dog and cat. We strongly encourage you to work with your pet’s vet to find the pet food that would be best for your dog or cat’s medical situation.

We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet. 

Does Your Senior Cat Need Senior Cat Food

As your pet ages, you may find that their eagerness to eat diminishes or if they develop an illness, you may be concerned if their diet is helping to manage the disease. However, deciding on the “best” diet for an older  cat can be a difficult decision; there is no one best diet for every older animal. The aging process depends on a variety of factors including breed, genetics, and health problems. Just because a food is marketed for older animals or because your pet reaches a certain age, doesn’t necessarily mean that it is time to switch to senior cat food. Learn more about senior pet food before switching your cat’s food.

Should you decide that switching to a senior pet food is appropriate for your senior cat, there are many senior cat foods on the market. Choosing which one is right for your senior pet can be a very difficult decision. 

Below are a few examples of senior pet foods available for senior cats. We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult with your vet before switching your pet’s food.

As pets age, some vets recommend that senior pets eat more protein in their diet. Below are two examples of cat foods formulated with senior pets in mind. 

Dry Food for Senior Cats

This is protein rich senior cat food to help support strong muscles and to provide healthy energy for play. Vitamin E helps restore immune response in older cats. Crunchy cat kibble texture helps reduce plaque buildup. Designed to help nourish strong bones and healthy joints, and maintain healthy weight.

This food offers real meat is the first ingredient. High quality protein helps your cat maintain strong muscles. Contains a precise blend of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals carefully selected by holistic veterinarians and animal nutritionists to support immune system health, life stage requirements and a healthy oxidative balance. 

Wet Food for Senior Cats

Some cats prefer wet food over dry food. You should look for wet senior cat food that offers real protein as the first ingredient. 

The is an example of wet food made with real salmon and tuna. It is specially formulated to meet the needs of cats age 11+ and helps support healthy skin and coat. This wet cat food formulated for senior cats provides essential nutrients to support healthy immune system.

The is an example of senior cat food that touts it is precisely balanced nutrition to sustain kidney and vital organ health in older cats. It provides mature cats with high-quality protein to maintain lean muscles  and supports an old cat’s immunity with clinically proven antioxidants and vitamin C + E. 

Let’s face it, even older cats love their treats. Sometimes they love treats more than their meals, so it is important a) not to over feed your senior pet with treats and b) find high quality treats that provide nutrients your senior cat may be missing out on from his food.

As cats age, they can develop issues with their teeth. Maintaining good oral health is important for cats of all ages, but especially for senior cats so they don’t lose their teeth, develop mouth pain, and refuse to eat because of issues with their teeth.

Cat Treats for Senior Cats

The is an example of a cat treat that is  made specifically for senior pets and although it states over age 15, they can be used for much younger senior cats.  These senior cat treats contain Vitamins E and B to support overall health. 

This is an example of senior cat treats are vet recommended dental treat that offers complete nutrition for adult cats to maintain healthy dental care. 

Does Your Senior Dog Need Senior Dog Food

As your pet ages, you may find that their eagerness to eat diminishes or if they develop an illness, you may be concerned if their diet is helping to manage the disease. However, deciding on the “best” diet for an older dog or cat can be a difficult decision; there is no one best diet for every older animal. The aging process depends on a variety of factors including breed, genetics, and health problems. Just because a food is marketed for older animals or because your pet reaches a certain age, doesn’t necessarily mean that it is time to switch to senior cat or dog food. Learn more about senior pet food before switching your dog’s food.

Should you decide that switching to a senior pet food is appropriate for your senior dog, there are many senior dog foods on the market. Choosing which one is right for your senior pet can be a very difficult decision. 

Below are a few examples of senior food available for senior dogs. We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult with your vet before switching your pet’s food.

Dry Senior Dog Food

Look for senior brands that have no added corn, wheat, soy, poultry by-product meal, artificial colors or flavors. Natural dog food with added vitamins, minerals and nutrients; developed specifically for senior dogs can be a good choice.  

Another dry senior dog food to consider offers precise nutrition specifically made for older dogs. Supports vitality with an exclusive blend of antioxidants for healthy aging to help maintain a long life. There are two examples of dog foods developed specifically for senior dogs. 

A specially formulated dog food may also be appropriate for your dog depending on his individual tastes.

Specialty Food Formulated Specifically for Your Dog

There are brands that use your dog’s unique profile details, a proprietary algorithm to determine a custom meal plan that offers optimal calorie intake for healthy weight. Pre-portioned dog food can be a good choice for senior dogs especially if your dog has certain health conditions or allergies that should be addressed through their diet. 

Keto Low Card Dry Dog Food

As dogs age, they can become more prone to inflammation, obesity, diabetes, elevated insulin and blood sugar levels, and cancers. A lower carb, keto friendly diet can help remove about 75% of the carbohydrates from your dog’s diet. If you believe that a lower carb diet can can help your senior pet, a keto friendly diet may be a good option for your senior pet. 

Some dogs prefer wet food over kibble. You should look for wet senior dog food that offers real protein as the first ingredient. 

Wet Senior Dog Food

This food features high quality protein from real chicken to support healthy muscle maintenance. No chicken by product meals, no corn, wheat or soy and no artificial flavors or preservatives. 

 Formulated specifically for older dogs to stimulate appetite so if your dog has become more finicky with age, this food might be an option to consider.

Fresh Dog Food

If you have heard that home cooking your dog’s meals is the right option for you, but you simply don’t have the time to cook home cooked food for your senior pet, fresh dog food delivered to your door might be an option to consider. These pre cooked meals are pre portioned to make meal time easier and less stressful. 

If you have a finicky older pet, switching to fresh dog food may help. 

Fresh dog food offers all natural ingredients, designed by a vet nutritionist, cooked in a USDA facility, personalized for your dog, offers four delicious recipes, comes in a resealable container, and offers flexible subscription options. 

The second example is fresh, healthy dog food delivered to your door. They offer a 100% money back guarantee if your dog is not in love with his new food. Features human grade ingredients, high quality meat, fruits and veggies, superfoods like chia seeds, and no by products, artificial flavors or preservatives. Plans are tailored to your dog’s needs. 

Raw Dog Food

You may have heard or believe that raw dog food is appropriate for your senior dog. 

RAW WILD

This food is all protein, all organic, all natural, balanced nutrition. There are no growth hormones, no antibiotics, no preservatives, no fillers, corn, grains, or rice and no animal byproducts. 

Dog Treats for Senior Dogs

Let’s face it, even older dogs love their treats. Sometimes they love treats more than their meals, so it is important a) not to over feed your senior pet with treats and b) find high quality treats that provide nutrients your senior dog may be missing out on from his food. 

The treats below are dental sticks with a fish and algae blend of Qrill Pet, DHAgold, and Salmon to nourish the skin and coat for a healthy appearance while also supporting dental health. 

If your senior dog is having hip or  joint issues, then you may want to consider a dog treat that addresses these issues in their formulation and are made specifically for senior pets. They feature chicken raised without hormones; high protein and low fat – they’re 100% real meat.