Which food bowl is best for older cats?

As cats age, they can become fussy eaters who may balk at their once beloved food dish. Senior cats, over age 7, often develop issues with digestion, which can exacerbate feeding issues even more. 

There are many different types of food dishes that cat’s eat from, including a flat dish, elevated dish, slow feeder dish, or different materials including stainless steel, porcelain, or plastic dishes to choose from. Elevated food bowls are designed to keep the food higher than your cat’s stomach, versus below the stomach with a traditional bowl or plate. A slow feeder forces your cat to slow down when eating, and can reduce the risk of vomiting or bloat. An elevated dish or a slow feeder can also help keep your cat’s weight in check by forcing them to eat more slowly than they would with a traditional flat bowl or plate. 

Elevated food bowls can help keep food in the bowl as well as help improve your cat’s digestion. An elevated food bowl can make it easier for your cat to eat, and helps keep spilled food and water to a minimum. An elevated bowl helps cats eat in a more natural position. She will also typically eat less when her bowl is a little higher than ground level. Elevated bowls can also help to prevent spine and hip problems commonly seen in older cats.

Another consideration with elevated food bowls for cats is gastric reflux. Older cats tend to have reflux and an elevated bowl tends to alleviate some of the symptoms associated with reflux. Raised food bowls can also help aid your cat’s digestion. Cats are also more likely to eat better with an elevated food bowl, because the food stays put and their is less strain on their body – which is especially important for older cats. 

Certain elevated food bowls, provide better comfort for cats when they eat and also provide backflow prevention. Other elevated bowls have an inner lip that means food won’t spill out of the bowl. 

When considering an elevated food bowl for your cat, there are many types of materials to choose from: stainless steel, porcelain, plastic, etc. Our preference is porcelain. Porcelain dishes do not absorb bacteria the way plastic dishes can and stainless steel dishes can be radioactive. Plastic dishes can also cause feline acne, due to a cat’s allergic reaction to the plastic. Porcelain dishes are dishwasher and microwave safe, and although more delicate/fragile than other types of dishes, they are the easiest to keep clean. 

Before you purchase an elevated food dish, consider the height of the bowl. An ideal height for an elevated feeding dish is cat’s knee height. Simply measure your cat’s leg up to the height of her knee to determine the ideal height of the elevated food bowl for your cat. 

Should you consider purchasing an elevated food bowl, please support our sponsor by visiting their website to learn more about their elevated cat food bowls. 

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet. 

How to Help a Senior Dog with Incontinence

As dogs get older, they may start to lose control over their bladder and bowels. Oftentimes, incontinence can be a symptom of several types of conditions. Certain breeds are more prone to develop incontinence and female dogs are more likely to develop urinary incontinence. Certain large breed dogs are more common to develop fecal incontinence. There are several medications that can be used to help with dog incontinence. 

If your senior dog has issues with incontinence, it is advisable that you consult with your vet first to determine the underlying condition. Dog diapers, belly bands and pee pads can help manage senior dog incontinence. Washable bedding and plastic sheets can also be used to help protect flooring or furniture. Water restriction, especially at bedtime, may also help in some cases. 

It’s important to note that house trained dogs often feel embarrassed when they soil indoors. Pee pads or indoor training can also help, as can taking your pet out more often. Dog diapers can be used, depending on the severity of the incontinence and whether it is urine or fecal. There are both disposable and washable diapers. Belly bands are used for male dogs to inhibit peeing, but they can also be used for light incontinence when used with a panty liner placed inside to soak up urine. Overalls are great for dogs who try to remove the diapers. Pee pads are great for dogs who may have difficulty getting up and down stairs to go outside, or for those senior dogs who may have frequent urination due to illness.  

Below are a few examples of incontinence products you might consider for senior dogs with incontinence issues. We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult with your vet before treating dog incontinence to rule out medical issues that can be treated by your vet. 

 

Disposable Male Dog Wraps

Disposable diapers should be adjustable to fit your dog comfortably. If the diaper has elastic edges it will allow for freedom of movement and leg lifting comfort. A wetness indicator helps you know when the diaper needs changing. 

Washable Male Wraps Diapers

Washable diapers are nice because they have no crinkle or uncomfortable texture. A velcro closure makes taking them on and off easy. Be sure the diaper pad sewn inside has a waterproof outer layer to prevent leaks and damage to rugs, etc. 

Female Dog Disposable Diapers

Disposable diapers designed for female dogs provide leak protection for dogs in heat, for dogs who suffer from excitable urination or incontinent dogs. Female dog diapers can also be used for urine, poop, diarrhea, and bowel incontinence. 

Washable Female Dog Diapers

Dog Diaper Overall

If your senior pet doesn’t like wearing an incontinence product then you may want to consider a diaper overall that cannot be easily pulled off.  Overall diapers are also suitable for odd-shaped or long-body dogs. 

Waterproof Dog Bed

A waterproof dog bed can be used as a stand-alone bed or inside a dog crate and is helpful for incontinent dogs because the washable cover zips off and is waterproof with a rubber grip non slip bottom. 

Indoor Potties

Some incontinent dogs have trouble getting outside, either due to hip dysplasia or arthritis, and become incontinent because of the difficulty they have getting in and out of the house. Indoor potties are also helpful if you are away extended hours and can’t give your pet the relief they need, especially as they age and cannot hold their urine or feces as long as they did when they were younger. 

Providing your senior dog with an indoor area to potty can help dogs get to their potty area faster, especially if going outside means navigating stairs or waiting for an elevator. This type of potty can be used on a balcony, deck or indoors for your pet’s convenience. 

Dog Urine Cleaning Products

Eliminate odors and stains, including urine, feces, vomit and drool with a stain and odor remover meant to eliminated dog incontinence messes. A product with a natural enzyme formula is safe for pets and home and can be used on floors, carpets, furniture, clothing, litter boxes, kennels, crates, and car upholstery.

Supplements for Urinary Health

If your dog is having difficulty with urine flow and inflammation or leaking urine, then it is important to speak with your vet about causes and potential treatments. Supplements may be prescribed to help reduce inflammation and encourage a healthy urine flow. Always consult with your vet before giving your dog any supplements as some can interfere with medications your dog may be taking. 

How a Pet Stroller May Help Your Senior Dog or Cat

Traveling with a pet can be challenging with even the most well behaved, calm, able-bodied pets. But there are certain situations when getting from point A to point B with a pet becomes a challenge. Transporting your furry friend with a pet stroller can prove very useful depending on your needs and the needs of your pet.

A pet stroller may seem a little strange at first, especially because most people expect small children or babies in a stroller, but pet strollers for dogs and cats are becoming more popular and accepted because a stroller is often a much safer alternative to walking a leashed pet, especially in certain situations.

How do you know if a pet stroller is right for your pet? 

Here are some specific things to factor when considering a pet stroller:

Does your pet enjoy being with you wherever you go?

Some situations wouldn’t allow for a leashed pet to accompany you, like restaurants or malls. Even some parks are not pet friendly when it comes to leashed pets. But if your pet is contained within a stroller, then more places might allow your pet into their establishment. A pet stroller can help you enjoy certain locations without worrying about whether your leashed pet is allowed.

Is your pet older?

Senior pets (large dogs over age 6 and small dogs and cats over age 7) can tire easily which can make long walks too tiring for them. If they are too tired, they may need to be carried part of the way. A pet stroller can help keep stress off your arms and back, by allowing you to just push your furry friend.

Does your pet have an illness like arthritis, joint pain, or hip dysplasia?

Certain illnesses might make walking any sort of distance painful for your pet and would make enduring a long walk very difficult for your pet. A stroller can make traveling more comfortable for your pet.

Does your pet have an injury or are they recovering from surgery?

Surgery or an injury can take a lot out of your pet. Some surgeries or injuries can make walking painful, difficult or even impossible, especially if your pet has a splint or cast on his leg. A pet stroller can make traveling easier for your pet.

Are you concerned with leaving your pet alone at home?

Some pets may have seizures or require pet meds to be administered at certain times of the day, making staying at home alone while you are away a complicated situation. A pet stroller can make it easier for you to monitor and care for your pet while you are out.

Does your pet get along with people or other pets?

Some pets can become aggressive around people or other animals. Some just jump on people or have annoying habits or aggressive tendencies that might make traveling into crowded areas challenging. A pet stroller can help control your pet in crowded areas.

Does your pet get stressed in crowds?

Some pets are socially anxious, and crowds may cause them to bark or shake in fear. A stroller offers a level of containment, confinement and security for an anxious pet. A pet stroller can help your pet relax.

Is it too hot, cold or wet outside?

Most animals don’t do well in extreme weather conditions, especially if it is too hot, too cold or wet outside. A pet stroller can protect your pet from the elements.

Do you have physical limitations that make controlling your leashed pet challenging?

Some pet owners have physical limitations, whether due to age or illness that may cause them to have difficulties controlling a leashed pet. For instance, if you walk with a cane, or if your dog is a puller and you are of a smaller frame, it may be hard for you to control your pet on a walk. A stroller can help you feel more secure and in control when traveling with your pet.

Sometimes, it’s not about anything except pampering your furry friend. If your dog or cat enjoys being outdoors with you, rather than cooped up in the house, and if you think your pet would enjoy strolling along in a pet stroller, than that’s the only need to consider.

Which pet stroller to choose?

So you’ve decided to invest in a pet stroller to transport your pet. Which pet stroller is right for you? There are a wide variety of pet strollers: there are jogging strollers, ultra-light strollers, strollers for large dogs, strollers for multiple dogs, strollers for cats, strollers for multiple cats, strollers that are completely enclosed, and strollers that allow your pet to be partially exposed. A lot depends on the type of outings you plan on using the stroller for. Here are some things to factor when considering which stroller is right for you.

How large is your pet (or will your pet get)?

When purchasing a pet stroller, size matters. You want to be sure you select a model that will accommodate your pet at full maturity. If you aren’t sure how big your pet will get, consult with your vet for an estimated size and weight.

Will you be transporting more than one pet?

If you own more than one pet, and you will transport multiple pets in the stroller, then you need to factor the combined weight and size and ensure that the stroller is large enough to accommodate multiple pets comfortably.

What is your pet’s temperament?

Some pets are jumpers or chasers and can become easily distracted by anything around them. The last thing you would want is for your pet to escape from the stroller to chase something or someone. A stroller with a full enclosure will ensure that pets who like to jump or chase stay contained within the compartment. If your pet is pretty easy going, then you can get a partially enclosed stroller that features an opening for him to stick his head out of. Most of these strollers will allow you to tether your pet to the stroller so they can’t escape.

How do you plan to use the stroller?

Will you be using the stroller to go to the mall or a restaurant or will you be jogging with your pet? The type of activity should determine which stroller would best suit your needs. Ultra-light strollers are probably better for leisurely walking, where a jogging stroller might be better for higher intensity activity.

Will you be traveling at night?

Some strollers have reflective material that are better for traveling at nighttime. Reflectors can always be purchased separately if you find that you are using the stroller a lot at night, but if you anticipate that evening excursions are your thing, then a stroller with reflective material is a great feature to have.

What is the weather going to be like?

Some strollers are weather resistant and are designed to keep your pet dry when it rains or snows. If you live in a climate where it is really hot, then a stroller with a lot of venting is probably better. If you live in a climate that is really cold, then an enclosed stroller might be warmer. If you live in a climate where it rains or snows and you will be outside in those conditions, then a water resistant or waterproof stroller might be best. Most companies sell optional, removable waterproof covers, so if you find a stroller you like but its not waterproof, a cover may solve the problem.

Key features to look for:

When selecting a pet stroller, look for features that will not only benefit your pet, but you as well. Features like cup holders, purse compartments, a storage basket, easy front and rear entry, retractable rain hoods, easy locking entry, etc. are just a few of the features that will make your trips with your pet more enjoyable for him, and for you.

Pet strollers are designed specifically for pets, or multiple pets. Unlike baby strollers, they have certain features that you may not find with a stroller designed for a person. Some have built in harnesses or buckles to attach a leash or harness to your pet. Some also have waterproof liners in case of accidents. Venting is also typically very different for pet strollers, as is the opening that allows you to place your pet inside.

If you’d like to enjoy more outings with your cat or dog, then a pet stroller may be something to consider.  

Content provided in collaboration with the Elderly Pet Organization and Engaging Pet Products – An Engaged Pet is a Happy Pet.

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet.

Why a Flat Feeding Plate is Better for Finicky Senior Pets

As pets age, many become finicky eaters who can make meal time frustrating for pet parents. Pet owners often think that switching to senior pet food, adding wet food, broth, food toppers or sprays, or some other tactic will help their senior pet eat better. However, in some cases, the food is not the issue. Rather, it is the pet feeding dish that causes distress for many older pets. 

Cats and dogs are domesticated wild animals whose survival depends on their awareness of their surroundings, especially when they are eating. A traditional feeding bowl obstructs an animal’s vision, and for cats can cause whisker stress especially if a pet’s whiskers, tags, or bowl height prevent them from putting their face in the bowl to eat. 

Some senior pets simply prefer to eat off the ground, which is how all pets eat in the wild. A traditional bowl goes against their natural animal instinct and some pets, especially senior pets who may have a diminished appetite, simply refuse to eat.  This can be especially distressful if you have an insulin dependent senior pet who needs to eat at regular intervals in order to receive his medication.

Another common issue often seen with older, finicky pets is that they prefer to be hand fed, or they will only eat treats, but they refuse food from their bowl. This is often another indication that the pet prefers eating from the floor, and another perspective on why a flat plate may be a solution. 

A flat feeding plate is the closest thing to a pet eating off the floor without having to resort to disgusting paper plates or even worse, eating off the dirty floor. A flat plate can also keep food in the dish, rather than dumping it all over the floor and making a mess everywhere. 
 

A flat plate is closer to the ground, which for smaller dogs and cats, is a more natural feeding position. A flat plate is not obstructive so your pet can see what is around him while he eats, and pet tags won’t hit the rim of a flat plate when pets are eating. Many animals are alarmed and become afraid of their feeding bowl because of the noise their tag makes when it hits the rim of the bowl. 

Another consideration when feeding senior pets is the material a feeding dish is made of. A BPA free plate won’t absorb bacteria the way other materials, like plastic and silicone can. Stainless steel dishes can be radioactive. 

A good flat plate should be made of high quality materials and be dishwasher as well as microwave safe. 

Should you have any questions about your finicky senior pet not eating at mealtime, it is important to consult your vet with any concerns you may have. If illness is not the issue, then switching to a flat plate might be the answer. 

Below are two examples of dogs who would not eat before switching to a flat plate.

Content provided in collaboration with the Elderly Pet Organization and The Pet Plate Complete Feeding System for Finicky Furry Friends.

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet. 

Read More about feeding senior pets.

Personalized Pet Gifts

A pet’s friendship is one of nature’s many gifts to us. As pet’s age, we start to realize they may not always be with us. A great way to honor the special bond you share with your beloved pet, or the beloved pet of a family member or friend, is with a personalized pet product with your adorable pet’s face on it. 

Blankets also make a great gift for senior dogs or cats who may have joint pain, hip dysplasia or sores, warts, masses or growths. A soft blanket can help alleviate some of the pressure due to these common ailments many senior pets have. 

A custom designed blanket featuring your dog, cat, ferret, bunny or any animal you adore can be personalized just for you. Once your selection is approved, your order is processed and your blanket will arrive in no time at all. 

Another idea is a personalized stuffed animal replica of your pet. There are custom stuffed animals, personalized pet pillows and custom pet socks – all customized with your furry friend’s photo. 

A personalized pet gift makes a great gift for holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, memorials, or for any occasion where pets are an important part of someone’s life. 

Personalized pet gifts are truly one-of-a kind gifts and are very special to the person receiving them. If you’re scratching your head trying to figure out what to get that hard-to-buy for person in your life, and if they are an avid animal lover who adores their pets, a personalized pet blanket, pillow, stuffed animal, or canvas of their furry friend makes a great gift. 

We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. 

 

WoofBlankets

Your dog deserves this!

These blankets are oversized; not your typical throw blanket that barely covers you. And the quality of the blankets is super soft, ultra plush, super cozy throw blanket for snuggling on the couch, bed or anywhere you want to feel a great big hug from your furry friend. The artwork is exceptional and true to the image supplied in the proof – if not better!

Petsies

How Pet Stairs and Steps May Help Your Pet Onto Furniture

It is not uncommon for senior pets (large dogs over age 6 and small dogs and cats over age 7) to have difficulty accessing high places, such as the bed, couch, or other higher surface in and around your home.  Millions of pets are injured every year attempting to jump up on or get up on higher surfaces, sometimes breaking a leg or severely injuring a tendon or joint. Senior pets often suffer from joint injuries or illnesses such as hip dysplasia, arthritis, torn ACL or other ailments, making jumping almost impossible for them. What’s more frustrating, is how heartbreaking it is to see an older dog or an injured dog attempt something he could once do, only to discover that he can no longer get on the surface he is attempting to get on.

Pet steps and stairs designed specifically for pets can help your pet regain his confidence and bring him the joy of being on his beloved surface. Pet steps and stairs are typically designed to be used at home or in a vehicle and come in a wide variety of styles and sizes. Steps and stairs are like regular stairs, although some have a shorter rise for smaller dogs and are designed to make it easier for your pet to get from point A to point B.

Pet steps and stairs can make life easier for your pet because they can provide an easier way for them to get where they want to go, or where you need them to go. This is especially true for larger dogs who may weigh too much for you to lift. Pet steps and stairs can help give your older pet confidence and can cause less stress for smaller pets who often take a big jump to get off and on some surfaces.

How do you know if pet steps and stairs are right for your pet? 

Here are some specific things to factor when considering pet steps and stairs:

Does your pet enjoy being on high surfaces he cannot reach on his own?

Some pets enjoy sitting on the couch during the day while they wait for their family to get home from work or school. It can be dangerous for a pet to attempt to jump onto or off the couch without help, especially if no one is home to assist them. Pet stairs and steps can help you pet get where they want to go more easily.

Is your pet older?

Senior pets (large dogs over age 6 and small dogs and cats over age 7) may not be able to jump like they once did. Pet steps and stairs can help them navigate higher places without worrying they may injure themselves.

Does your pet have an illness like arthritis, joint pain, or hip dysplasia?

Certain illnesses might make jumping up on furniture painful for your pet. Pet steps and stairs can make getting on and off furniture more comfortable for your pet.

Does your pet have an injury or are they recovering from surgery?

Surgery or an injury can take a lot out of your pet. Some surgeries or injuries can make jumping painful, difficult or even impossible, especially if your pet has a splint or cast on his leg. Pet steps and stairs can make getting up on higher surfaces easier for your pet.

Do you have physical limitations that make helping your pet into the car challenging?

Some pet owners have physical limitations, whether due to age or illness that may cause them to have difficulties lifting a pet. For instance, if you have a bad back, or if your dog is a too heavy for you to lift, it may be hard for you to lift your pet onto the bed. Pet steps and stairs can help ensure you won’t injure yourself whenever you want to take a nap with your pet.

Sometimes, it’s not about anything except pampering your furry friend. If your dog or cat enjoys being with you when you sleep and if you think your pet would enjoy getting on and off the bed on his own, then steps and stairs may be ideal for you and your pet.

You should consult with your vet when considering steps and stairs for your senior pet because every situation is different and what may be right for one pet, may not be right for another pet.

Which pet steps and stairs to choose?

So, you’ve decided to invest in pet steps or stairs to help your pet get onto furniture. Which pet steps and stairs are right for you? There are a wide variety of pet steps and stairs: Some are made of wood, plastic or high-density foam. Some are designed specifically for smaller pets, while others are designed for larger pets. Some are carpeted or have nonskid surfaces. Some are lightweight and easy to tote from room to room. Some are temporary and can fold out of the way; others are more permanent and can be kept in a fixed location. Here are some things to factor when considering which pet steps or stairs are right for you.

How large is your pet (or will your pet get)?

When purchasing a pet steps and stairs, size matters. You want to be sure you select a model that will accommodate your pet at full maturity. If you aren’t sure how big your pet will get, consult with your vet for an estimated size and weight.

How do you plan to use the steps and stairs?

Will you be using the steps and stairs to help your pet get on the bed or the couch? If you will be using the steps near the bed, consider how your pet typically would access the furniture and place the steps near where he is accustomed to getting onto the furniture.

Will the pet steps and stairs fit in your space?

Steps and stairs come in different sizes, styles and heights. It’s a good idea to select a steps and stairs that will not only fit the space where you plan to use it, but also fit the size of your pet. It’s important to measure the space and choose steps that will not be in the way of other pets or visitors.

How to train your pet to use a steps and stairs?

A pet steps and stairs are designed to be similar to household stairs. Some dogs may be intimidated at first and will require some training, patience and praise to properly teach your pet to use the steps and stairs. Remember, he may be accustomed to jumping on the furniture, so the steps and stairs may initially be an obstacle.

Some pets are afraid of steps and stairs initially, but with proper training and guidance, and plenty of treats, your pet may learn to love his new way to access the furniture. The best way to train a pet is to guide them up the steps and stairs with a toy or a treat. Most dogs learn to use steps and stairs pretty quickly especially going up the steps and stairs. Going down the steps and stairs can take more time, patience and practice. The tendency will be for them to jump off the surface and completely bypass the steps and stairs. Again, training and patience are key to teaching your dog the proper method for using the steps and stairs, especially if they are accustomed to jumping.

Key features to look for:

When selecting a pet steps and stairs, look for features that will not only benefit your pet, but you and your lifestyle as well. Steps and stairs can coordinate with your home décor and some steps and stairs might be easier on your pet’s joints than others.

Pet steps and stairs are designed specifically for pets and they are not designed to be used by a person. Some are made of wood; others are made of plastic or foam. Some are lightweight and very easy to move from room to room; others are heavier or designed for higher surfaces. Some are designed for small dogs and cats; others are made specifically for large dogs.

If you’d like to help your pet get where he wants to go more easily, then a pet steps and stairs may be something to consider.  

Content provided in collaboration with the Elderly Pet Organization and Engaging Pet Products – An Engaged Pet is a Happy Pet.

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet.

 

How a Pet Car Booster Seat Can Keep Your Cat or Dog Safe When You Travel

Traveling with a pet can be challenging with even the most well behaved, calm, able-bodied pets. But there are certain situations when getting from point A to point B with a pet becomes a challenge. Transporting your furry friend with a booster seat can prove very useful depending on your needs and the needs of your pet. A car booster seat provides a safe place for your pet to ride in the car and also provides enough lift to allow him to see out the window when you travel. Car booster seats are typically designed for small to medium sized dogs. For a large dog, you may not be able to find a car seat large enough for your pet; in which case a harness or tether can be used to keep your pet secure in the car.

A pet booster seat may seem a little strange at first, especially because most people expect small children or babies in a booster seat, but pet car seats or booster seats for dogs and cats are becoming more popular and accepted because a car seat is often a much safer alternative to traveling with an unleashed pet, especially in certain situations.

How do you know if a pet car seat is right for your pet? 

Here are some specific things to factor when considering a pet car seat or booster seat:

Are you concerned with your pet’s safety when traveling in the car?

Most vehicles were not designed with pets in mind. Most cars do not offer any features that would secure a pet while traveling. It really is up to pet owners to do their due diligence to ensure that their pet is as safe as possible when traveling in a car. A pet car seat or booster seat can help ensure that your pet is traveling as safely as possible.

Does your pet distract you when you are driving?

Some pets cannot behave when traveling in the car. They often jump around or cause other distractions that can be dangerous for drivers. Distracted driving is one of the leading causes of car accidents, and a loose pet who cannot behave can be very distracting for drivers. A car seat or booster seat can help keep your pet secured in their seat so they are unable to jump around and distract you while driving.

Does your pet enjoy looking out the window when you travel by car?

Some pets are just too small to look out the window unless they are sitting in your lap. Traveling with a pet who is in your lap is unsafe not only for you, where you can be easily distracted, but also for your pet, especially if you need to stop short. A booster car seat can be secured in the car with a standard seat belt and is designed to boost your pet high enough to see out the window as you travel. A booster car seat can help keep you and your pet safe while you travel.

Are you concerned with leaving your pet alone at home?

Some pets may have seizures or require frequent medications administered at certain times of the day, making staying at home alone while you are away a complicated situation. A pet car seat, especially one that converts to a carrier, can make it easier for you to monitor and care for your pet while you are out.

Will you be traveling by car and also plane, bus or train?

If you are planning on taking your furry friend on car rides, but you also need to transport her onto a plane, bus or train, several car booster seats can also be used as a pet carrier. Check with the manufacturer to be sure the booster car seat carrier is airline approved. As of this writing the recommended maximum dimensions for a soft sided kennel or carrier is 18“ long x 11” wide x 11” high. Soft sided carriers can be slightly larger because they are collapsible and able to fit underneath the seat without blocking the aisle.

Sometimes, it’s not about anything except keeping your furry friend safe. If your dog or cat enjoys traveling with you, rather than cooped up in the house, and if you think your pet would enjoy riding in a booster car seat, then that’s the only need to consider.

Which pet car seat to choose?

So you’ve decided to invest in a pet car seat to transport your pet. Which pet car seat is right for you? There are a wide variety of pet car seats: Here are some things to factor when considering which stroller is right for you.

How large is your pet (or will your pet get)?

When purchasing a pet car seat, size matters. You want to be sure you select a model that will accommodate your pet at full maturity. If you aren’t sure how big your pet will get, consult with your vet for an estimated size and weight.

Will you be transporting more than one pet?

If you own more than one pet, and you will transport multiple pets in the car seat, then you need to factor the combined weight and size and ensure that the car seat is large enough to accommodate multiple pets comfortably. A bucket seat booster is designed to be large enough for two small pets.

Do you need it to be high enough for your pet to have a view?

Not all car seats are booster seats; some are purely used to keep your pet secure in the vehicle. A booster seat will not only keep your pet safe but can add up to 10 inches of height in order to give them a clear view out the window. A car booster seat can help keep your pet calm if they are distracted by looking out the window.

How do you plan to use the car seat?

Will you be using the car seat to go from the car to the vet or a friend’s house? Do you need to keep your pet secure not only in the car, but after the car ride? A booster travel system is a carrier that converts to a booster seat in the car, attaches to a base, and can be easily removed to take your pet from the car to the store or vet with ease.

Key features to look for:

When selecting a pet car booster seat, look for features that will not only benefit your pet, but you as well. Some car booster seats fit both front and back seat. Some are machine washable. Some allow your pet to see out the window. Some include a built in security leash or tether. Some feature soft padding or adjustable straps. Some can double as an airline approved carrier or regular pet carrier.

Pet car seats are designed specifically for pets, or multiple pets. Unlike child car seats, they have certain features that you may not find with a car seat designed for a person. Some have built in harnesses or buckles to attach a leash or harness to your pet. Some also have waterproof liners in case of accidents. Venting is also typically very different for pet car seats, as is the opening that allows you to place your pet inside.

If you’d like to enjoy more outings with your cat or dog, then a pet car booster seat may be something to consider.  

Content provided in collaboration with the Elderly Pet Organization and Engaging Pet Products – An Engaged Pet is a Happy Pet.

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet.

Help for Senior Pets with Allergies

Pets can develop allergies at any stage of life, but allergies in elderly pets can be very frustrating, not only for pet parents but also for pets. Pets with allergies are often itchy and uncomfortable and can cause skin irritations that need to be addressed by a vet.

The good news is, there are new medications available to help treat pet allergies that can alleviate most if not all symptoms, helping your elderly pet live more comfortably. There are also more holistic options available for treating a senior pet who is suffering from allergies, including hypoallergenic foods, shampoos and conditioners made for sensitive skin, and more.

The first thing you should do if you see your pet constantly scratching, licking his paws, or gnawing at his fur, is to talk with your vet especially if you notice excessive licking, scratching or general discomfort. If allergies are diagnosed, there are medications, as well as holistic treatments that can help.

If your elderly pet is suffering from allergies, there are several steps you can take to help your senior pet.

  1. Talk with your vet to determine if allergies is the actual cause of your pet’s discomfort and discuss possible treatment options that may help.
  2. Consider switching your pet’s diet. Some vets recommend home cooked diets to help control allergies, but you should work with your vet before switching your pet’s food. You can also work with a vet nutritional specialist to determine what foods may help reduce symptoms.
  3. Bathe your pet more regularly and consider a hypo allergenic shampoo. Pets who have allergies tend to flare up the more they are exposed to allergens. Bathing helps remove some of the allergens and can reduce symptoms. Also, wiping your pet’s paws with hypoallergenic towelettes can also reduce allergy symptoms.
  4. Salmon oil may help some pets alleviate dry and itchy skin
  5. Keep your home free of allergy triggers. Like people, pets are susceptible to household allergies like dust and mold. Cleaning your home regularly can help reduce allergens and help improve your pets symptoms. A cool mist humidifier can also put moisture in the air during dry weather and can help relieve dry, itchy skin.

If you suspect that your elderly pet has allergies, do what you can to help but be sure to speak with your vet to determine if allergies are the true cause of your pet’s discomfort. Rest assured, with the proper care and treatment, your furry friend should feel better in no time.

Allergy medications can be expensive and pet insurance can help offset the cost of allergy medications that your vet may recommend.

We highly recommend pet insurance for senior pets. It’s important that you purchase pet insurance before your pet is diagnosed with a particular illness because most pet insurance will not cover a pet with a pre-existing medical condition. Visit our pet insurance facts page for more information about pet insurance.

Below are a few examples of options you might consider for senior dogs with allergies. We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult with your vet before using any products or switching your pet’s food.

 

Hypoallergenic dog food is a good option for senior dogs with allergies. Watch for dog foods that contain corn, wheat or soy which can be allergy triggers for many senior pets. 

For cat’s with sensitive skin and stomach issues, a hypoallergenic cat food developed specifically for cat’s with sensitivities and allergies is a good option to consider for your senior cat. 

A hypoallergenic pet shampoo should treat yeast infections, ringworm, pyoderma and skin allergies, plus a good shampoo also deodorizes and gently cleanses skin. 

Hypoallergenic wipes developed for cats or dogs with sensitive skin can be used in between washing to help remove dust, dander or dirt that can irritate your pet’s skin.

Salmon oil is a natural fish oil additive supplement that supports the skin, coat, hips, joints, heart and immune system. Developed for cats and dogs to help alleviate dry skin, dull shedding coat, hot spots, or itching and irritation. 

This vacuum is features an anti allergen complete seal technology plus HEPA filter to trap 99.9% of dust and allergens inside the vacuum. 

A cool mist humidifier safely moisturizes the dry air in your room letting you breathe easy and moisturizes skin to alleviate discomfort. 

Which Pet Carrier is Best for your Senior Pet

As pets age, many senior pets prefer to spend more time with their pet parents. For some, there may be medications that need to be administered at certain times, and for others, there may be illnesses that make it more difficult for your pet to endure long walks. A pet carrier is a great option to help tote your furry friend around and keep a close eye on your senior pet.

Cats and small dogs are considered seniors at age 7, and as pets age, they become more dependent on us to care for them. A luxury pet carrier, like any luxury handbag, will make you and your pet feel like you are out on the town in high style. 

A carrier handbag that is designed specifically for pets is a better option than a handbag you may use for your personal belongings. Pet carrier handbags offer features designed specifically for toting a pet inside the bag. For instance, many have padding inside the bag that is waterproof and washable, in case your pet has an accident. There are often multiple compartments to carry your cat or dog’s gear and accessories she might need for a day on the town. 

Depending on how you like to travel with your pet, there are pet bags that are designed for longer trips, or short excursions. There are traditional tote style handbags as well as backpacks. There are bags that make a statement and others that are just fun and whimsical. There are carrier purse bags available for anyone’s style – but most importantly, to keep your senior pet with you when you are out. 

Another great feature of a handbag or backpack designed specifically for pets is most pet carrier bags feature ventilation for your pet, to keep your pet comfortable in the bag. Most carriers have weight limits or are appropriate for either a cat or a dog, so check with the manufacturer to ensure the carrier you choose is appropriate for your pet. 

How do you know if a pet carrier is right for your pet? 

Here are some specific things to factor when considering a pet carrier:

Does your pet enjoy being with you wherever you go?

Some situations wouldn’t allow for a leashed pet to accompany you, like restaurants or malls. Even some parks are not pet friendly when it comes to leashed pets. But if your pet is contained within a carrier, then more places might allow your pet into their establishment. A pet carrier can help you enjoy certain locations without worrying about whether your leashed pet is allowed.

Is your pet older?

Senior pets (small dogs and cats over age 7) can tire easily which can make long walks too tiring for them. If they are too tired, they may need to be carried part of the way. A pet carrier can allow you to carry your pet easily and contained.

Does your pet have an illness like arthritis, joint pain, or hip dysplasia?

Certain illnesses might make walking any sort of distance painful for your pet and would make enduring a long walk very difficult for your pet. A carrier can make traveling more comfortable for your pet.

Does your pet have an injury or are they recovering from surgery?

Surgery or an injury can take a lot out of your pet. Some surgeries or injuries can make walking painful, difficult or even impossible, especially if your pet has a splint or cast on his leg. A pet carrier can make traveling easier for your pet.

Are you concerned with leaving your pet alone at home?

Some pets may have seizures or require frequent pet meds to be administered at certain times of the day, making staying at home alone while you are away a complicated situation. A pet carrier can make it easier for you to monitor and care for your pet while you are out.

Does your pet get along with people or other pets?

Some pets can become aggressive around people or other animals. Some just jump on people or have annoying habits or aggressive tendencies that might make traveling into crowded areas challenging. A pet carrier can help control your pet in crowded areas.

Does your pet get stressed in crowds?

Some pets are socially anxious, and crowds may cause them to bark or shake in fear. A carrier offers a level of containment, confinement and security for an anxious pet. A pet carrier can help your pet relax.

Is it too hot, cold or wet outside?

Most animals don’t do well in extreme weather conditions, especially if it is too hot, too cold or wet outside. A pet carrier can protect your pet from the elements.

Which pet carrier to choose?

So you’ve decided to invest in a pet carrier to transport your pet. Which pet carrier is right for you? There are a wide variety of pet carriers: there are tote style handbags, traditional pet carriers, sling pet carriers, and backpack style carriers. A lot depends on the type of outings you plan on using the carrier for. Here are some things to factor when considering which carrier is right for you.

How large is your pet (or will your pet get)?

When purchasing a pet carrier, size matters. You want to be sure you select a style that will accommodate your pet at full maturity. If you aren’t sure how big your pet will get, consult with your vet for an estimated size and weight.

What is your pet’s temperament?

Some pets are jumpers or chasers and can become easily distracted by anything around them. The last thing you would want is for your pet to escape from the carrier to chase something or someone. A carrier with a full enclosure will ensure that pets who like to jump or chase stay contained within the compartment. If your pet is pretty easy going, then you can get a partially enclosed carrier that features an opening for him to stick his head out of. Most of these carriers will allow you to tether your pet to the carrier so they can’t escape.

How do you plan to use the carrier?

Will you be using the carrier to go to the mall or a restaurant? The type of activity should determine which carrier would best suit your needs. Will you be using the carrier in the car as well as walking around? If so, you may want to consider a carrier that has a dual purpose, and can be converted from a car seat to a carrier. If you are looking for something more stylish, then a sling or tote may be more appropriate for you and your pet.

If you’d like to enjoy more outings with your cat or dog, then a pet carrier may be something to consider.  

Content provided in collaboration with the Elderly Pet Organization and Engaging Pet Products – An Engaged Pet is a Happy Pet.

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet.

Senior Pet Food for Elderly Pets

As your pet ages, you may find that their eagerness to eat diminishes or if they develop an illness, you may be concerned if their diet is helping to manage the disease. However, deciding on the “best” diet for an older dog or cat can be a difficult decision; there is no one best diet for every older animal. The aging process depends on a variety of factors including breed, genetics, and health problems. Just because a food is marketed for older animals or because your pet reaches a certain age, doesn’t necessarily mean that it is time to switch to senior cat or dog food.

Although most pets are considered senior pets at age 7, not all pets will exhibit signs of aging like lower energy and the tendency to gain fat and lose muscle. Immune function and kidney function may also decline with age, although the degree to which this occurs will depend on the individual animal.Although your pet may be considered an older pet, adjustment of his diet may or may not be necessary or even desirable in older animals. Many older dogs and cats can continue to eat a good quality commercial adult diet and do not need to be changed to a different diet, especially if they are still eating well and have no health problems.

Other aging dogs and cats, however, may benefit from a switch to a “senior” diet. It is important to understand that there is no legal definition for “senior” foods – diets marketed as senior diets need to follow the same legal guidelines as diets for adult pets. Some foods will meet the needs of an individual animal better than others.

Some of the nutrients that may need to be adjusted as a pet ages (but are not necessarily modified in individual senior diets) include the following:

  1. Protein: There is no evidence that a diet low in protein or high in protein is optimal for an aging pet. The subject is still quite controversial and unless your vet suggests otherwise, no adjustment to the amount of protein your pet gets is advised.
  1. Phosphorus: Lowering dietary phosphorus has been shown to be beneficial in pets with kidney disease, but it is not known whether low dietary phosphorus can reduce the risk of development of kidney disease. It is important to work with your veterinarian to determine how much phosphorus is recommended for your pet.
  1. Sodium: Sodium levels vary widely in senior diets. Restricting dietary sodium is unnecessary for the general population of older dogs and cats, but may be recommended if heart disease, high blood pressure, or kidney disease are present.
  1. Calories: Older pets may tend to gain weight as they age (although some lose weight) and calorie consumption may be a concern if either situation exists. Extra pounds around the middle can cause or worsen other diseases, such as diabetes or arthritis. The calories in commercial senior diets for dogs and cats vary widely so you should work with your veterinarian to carefully select the most appropriate diet for your senior pet to maintain his or her optimal body weight.
  1. Fiber: Increased fiber intake may be useful for dogs and cats that have certain intestinal issues, but high fiber foods are not right for all older animals. For example, many of the commercial high fiber diets would not be ideal for animals that have difficulty maintaining weight since these diets are typically low in calories. It is important to consult with your vet if your pet has difficulty maintaining weight.
  1. Supplemental vitamins and minerals: If you’re feeding your pet a good quality commercial food, supplementation is typically not unnecessary. While some supplements may be helpful if your pet has certain illnesses, it is important to note that supplements are regulated very differently from drugs and there may be  concerns with safety, effectiveness and quality control. It is important to discuss any supplements you are considering for your pet with your vet because many have side effects and possible interactions with medications.

If your senior dog or cat is healthy, in good body condition, and eating a good quality nutritionally balanced diet, there is no reason to change foods. However, if your pet has developed arthritis, diabetes, cancer, dental problems, heart disease, or kidney disease, dietary adjustments may help improve symptoms or even slow progression of the disease.

There are many good quality commercial diets available today, and their variable nutrient content provides many choices for optimizing the health of your elderly dog and cat. We strongly encourage you to work with your pet’s vet to find the pet food that would be best for your dog or cat’s medical situation.

We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet. 

How a Pet Ramp May Help Pets into the Car or Furniture

It is not uncommon for pets to have difficulty accessing high places, such as the bed, couch, car or other higher surface in and around your home.  Millions of pets are injured every year attempting to jump up on or get up on higher surfaces, sometimes breaking a leg or severely injuring a tendon or joint. Senior pets often suffer from joint injuries or illnesses such as hip dysplasia, arthritis, torn ACL or other ailments, making jumping almost impossible for them. What’s more frustrating, is how heartbreaking it is to see an older dog or an injured dog attempt something he could once do, only to discover that he can no longer get on the surface he is attempting to get on.

Pet ramps designed specifically for pets can help your pet regain his confidence and bring him the joy of being on his beloved surface. Pet ramps are typically designed to be used at home or in a vehicle and come in a wide variety of styles and sizes. A ramp is a flat piece of plastic, metal or wood that extends from a higher surface down to a flat surface and is designed to make it easier for your pet to get from point A to point B.

A pet ramp can make life easier for your pet because they can provide an easier way for them to get where they want to go, or where you need them to go. This is especially true for larger dogs who may weigh too much for you to lift. A ramp can help give your older pet confidence and can cause less stress for smaller pets who often take a big jump to get off and on some surfaces.

How do you know if pet ramps are right for your pet? 

Here are some specific things to factor when considering pet ramps:

Does your pet enjoy being on high surfaces he cannot reach on his own?

Many pets enjoy an outing in the car, but getting into and out of the car can be a challenge, especially for large dogs who may have an injury or arthritis, or for a smaller dog who may be anxious about jumping in and out of the car. A pet ramp can make it much easier and cause less stress for your pet.

Is your pet older?

Senior pets (large dogs over age 6 and small dogs and cats over age 7) may not be able to jump like they once did. Pet ramps can help them navigate higher places without worrying they may injure themselves.

Does your pet have an illness like arthritis, joint pain, or hip dysplasia?

Certain illnesses might make jumping up in and out of the car or on furniture painful for your pet. Pet ramps can make getting in and out of the car more comfortable for your pet.

Does your pet have an injury or are they recovering from surgery?

Surgery or an injury can take a lot out of your pet. Some surgeries or injuries can make jumping painful, difficult or even impossible, especially if your pet has a splint or cast on his leg. Pet ramps can make getting up on higher surfaces easier for your pet.

Do you have physical limitations that make helping your pet into the car challenging?

Some pet owners have physical limitations, whether due to age or illness that may cause them to have difficulties lifting a pet. For instance, if you have a bad back, or if your dog is a too heavy for you to lift, it may be hard for you to lift your pet into the car. Pet ramps can help ensure you won’t injure yourself whenever you want to take a ride with your pet.

Sometimes, it’s not about anything except pampering your furry friend. If your dog or cat enjoys being with you when you travel and if you think your pet would enjoy getting in and out of the car on his own, then a ramp may be ideal for you and your pet.

You should consult with your vet when considering ramps for your senior pet because every situation is different and what may be right for one pet, may not be right for another pet.

Which pet ramps to choose?

So, you’ve decided to invest in a pet ramp to help your pet get in and out of the car, or onto furniture. Which pet ramp is right for you? There are a wide variety of pet ramps: there are ramps that are folding or telescoping. Some are designed specifically for smaller pets, while others are designed for larger pets. Some are carpeted or have nonskid surfaces. Some are lightweight and easy to tote from the house to the car. Some are temporary and can fold out of the way; others are more permanent and can be kept in a fixed location. Here are some things to factor when considering which pet ramp is right for you.

How large is your pet (or will your pet get)?

When purchasing a pet ramp, size matters. You want to be sure you select a model that will accommodate your pet at full maturity. If you aren’t sure how big your pet will get, consult with your vet for an estimated size and weight.

How do you plan to use the ramp?

Will you be using the ramp to help your pet get on the bed or the couch? Or will you predominantly use the ramp when traveling? If it will be used more for the car, then a foldable, telescoping ramp may be better so it can fit in the car.

Will the pet ramp fit in your space?

Ramps come in different sizes, styles and heights. It’s a good idea to select a ramp that will not only fit the space where you plan to use it, but also fit the size of your pet. Consider how your pet would normally access the furniture or the car. For instance, if your pet accessed the bed at the foot of the bed, then that is where the ramp should go.

How to train your pet to use a ramp?

A pet ramp is designed to be similar to walking on flat ground, except it is inclined. Some dogs may be intimidated at first and will require some training, patience and praise to properly teach your pet to use the ramp. Remember, he may be accustomed to jumping on the furniture, so the ramp may initially be seen as an obstacle.

Some pets are afraid of ramps initially, but with proper training and guidance, and plenty of treats, your pet may learn to love his new way to access the furniture or the car. The best way to train a pet is to guide them up the ramp with a toy or a treat. Most dogs learn to use ramp pretty quickly, especially going up the ramp. Going down the ramp can take more time, patience and practice. The tendency will be for them to jump off the surface and completely bypass the ramp. Again, training and patience are key to teaching your dog the proper method for using the ramp, especially if they are accustomed to jumping.

Key features to look for:

When selecting a pet ramp, look for features that will not only benefit your pet, but you and your lifestyle as well. Ramps can coordinate with your home décor and some ramps might be easier on your pet’s joints than others.

Pet ramps are designed specifically for pets and they are not designed to be used by a person. Some are made of wood; others are made of plastic or metal. Some are lightweight and very easy to move from room to room; others are heavier or designed for cars or higher surfaces. Some are designed for small dogs and cats; others are made specifically for large dogs.

If you’d like to help your pet get where he wants to go more easily, then a pet ramp may be something to consider.  

Content provided in collaboration with the Elderly Pet Organization and Engaging Pet Products – An Engaged Pet is a Happy Pet.

We do not endorse or promote any products or companies. You should always consult your vet to determine what is most appropriate for your senior pet.

Does Your Senior Cat Need Senior Cat Food

As your pet ages, you may find that their eagerness to eat diminishes or if they develop an illness, you may be concerned if their diet is helping to manage the disease. However, deciding on the “best” diet for an older  cat can be a difficult decision; there is no one best diet for every older animal. The aging process depends on a variety of factors including breed, genetics, and health problems. Just because a food is marketed for older animals or because your pet reaches a certain age, doesn’t necessarily mean that it is time to switch to senior cat food. Learn more about senior pet food before switching your cat’s food.

Should you decide that switching to a senior pet food is appropriate for your senior cat, there are many senior cat foods on the market. Choosing which one is right for your senior pet can be a very difficult decision. 

Below are a few examples of senior pet foods available for senior cats. We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult with your vet before switching your pet’s food.

As pets age, some vets recommend that senior pets eat more protein in their diet. Below are two examples of cat foods formulated with senior pets in mind. 

Dry Food for Senior Cats

This is protein rich senior cat food to help support strong muscles and to provide healthy energy for play. Vitamin E helps restore immune response in older cats. Crunchy cat kibble texture helps reduce plaque buildup. Designed to help nourish strong bones and healthy joints, and maintain healthy weight.

This food offers real meat is the first ingredient. High quality protein helps your cat maintain strong muscles. Contains a precise blend of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals carefully selected by holistic veterinarians and animal nutritionists to support immune system health, life stage requirements and a healthy oxidative balance. 

Wet Food for Senior Cats

Some cats prefer wet food over dry food. You should look for wet senior cat food that offers real protein as the first ingredient. 

The is an example of wet food made with real salmon and tuna. It is specially formulated to meet the needs of cats age 11+ and helps support healthy skin and coat. This wet cat food formulated for senior cats provides essential nutrients to support healthy immune system.

The is an example of senior cat food that touts it is precisely balanced nutrition to sustain kidney and vital organ health in older cats. It provides mature cats with high-quality protein to maintain lean muscles  and supports an old cat’s immunity with clinically proven antioxidants and vitamin C + E. 

Let’s face it, even older cats love their treats. Sometimes they love treats more than their meals, so it is important a) not to over feed your senior pet with treats and b) find high quality treats that provide nutrients your senior cat may be missing out on from his food.

As cats age, they can develop issues with their teeth. Maintaining good oral health is important for cats of all ages, but especially for senior cats so they don’t lose their teeth, develop mouth pain, and refuse to eat because of issues with their teeth.

Cat Treats for Senior Cats

The is an example of a cat treat that is  made specifically for senior pets and although it states over age 15, they can be used for much younger senior cats.  These senior cat treats contain Vitamins E and B to support overall health. 

This is an example of senior cat treats are vet recommended dental treat that offers complete nutrition for adult cats to maintain healthy dental care. 

Does Your Senior Dog Need Senior Dog Food

As your pet ages, you may find that their eagerness to eat diminishes or if they develop an illness, you may be concerned if their diet is helping to manage the disease. However, deciding on the “best” diet for an older dog or cat can be a difficult decision; there is no one best diet for every older animal. The aging process depends on a variety of factors including breed, genetics, and health problems. Just because a food is marketed for older animals or because your pet reaches a certain age, doesn’t necessarily mean that it is time to switch to senior cat or dog food. Learn more about senior pet food before switching your dog’s food.

Should you decide that switching to a senior pet food is appropriate for your senior dog, there are many senior dog foods on the market. Choosing which one is right for your senior pet can be a very difficult decision. 

Below are a few examples of senior food available for senior dogs. We do not endorse or promote any of these products or companies. Products are listed for demonstration purposes only based on available information at the time of publication. You should always consult with your vet before switching your pet’s food.

Dry Senior Dog Food

Look for senior brands that have no added corn, wheat, soy, poultry by-product meal, artificial colors or flavors. Natural dog food with added vitamins, minerals and nutrients; developed specifically for senior dogs can be a good choice.  

Another dry senior dog food to consider offers precise nutrition specifically made for older dogs. Supports vitality with an exclusive blend of antioxidants for healthy aging to help maintain a long life. There are two examples of dog foods developed specifically for senior dogs. 

A specially formulated dog food may also be appropriate for your dog depending on his individual tastes.

Specialty Food Formulated Specifically for Your Dog

There are brands that use your dog’s unique profile details, a proprietary algorithm to determine a custom meal plan that offers optimal calorie intake for healthy weight. Pre-portioned dog food can be a good choice for senior dogs especially if your dog has certain health conditions or allergies that should be addressed through their diet. 

Keto Low Card Dry Dog Food

As dogs age, they can become more prone to inflammation, obesity, diabetes, elevated insulin and blood sugar levels, and cancers. A lower carb, keto friendly diet can help remove about 75% of the carbohydrates from your dog’s diet. If you believe that a lower carb diet can can help your senior pet, a keto friendly diet may be a good option for your senior pet. 

Some dogs prefer wet food over kibble. You should look for wet senior dog food that offers real protein as the first ingredient. 

Wet Senior Dog Food

This food features high quality protein from real chicken to support healthy muscle maintenance. No chicken by product meals, no corn, wheat or soy and no artificial flavors or preservatives. 

 Formulated specifically for older dogs to stimulate appetite so if your dog has become more finicky with age, this food might be an option to consider.

Fresh Dog Food

If you have heard that home cooking your dog’s meals is the right option for you, but you simply don’t have the time to cook home cooked food for your senior pet, fresh dog food delivered to your door might be an option to consider. These pre cooked meals are pre portioned to make meal time easier and less stressful. 

If you have a finicky older pet, switching to fresh dog food may help. 

Fresh dog food offers all natural ingredients, designed by a vet nutritionist, cooked in a USDA facility, personalized for your dog, offers four delicious recipes, comes in a resealable container, and offers flexible subscription options. 

The second example is fresh, healthy dog food delivered to your door. They offer a 100% money back guarantee if your dog is not in love with his new food. Features human grade ingredients, high quality meat, fruits and veggies, superfoods like chia seeds, and no by products, artificial flavors or preservatives. Plans are tailored to your dog’s needs. 

Raw Dog Food

You may have heard or believe that raw dog food is appropriate for your senior dog. 

RAW WILD

This food is all protein, all organic, all natural, balanced nutrition. There are no growth hormones, no antibiotics, no preservatives, no fillers, corn, grains, or rice and no animal byproducts. 

Dog Treats for Senior Dogs

Let’s face it, even older dogs love their treats. Sometimes they love treats more than their meals, so it is important a) not to over feed your senior pet with treats and b) find high quality treats that provide nutrients your senior dog may be missing out on from his food. 

The treats below are dental sticks with a fish and algae blend of Qrill Pet, DHAgold, and Salmon to nourish the skin and coat for a healthy appearance while also supporting dental health. 

If your senior dog is having hip or  joint issues, then you may want to consider a dog treat that addresses these issues in their formulation and are made specifically for senior pets. They feature chicken raised without hormones; high protein and low fat – they’re 100% real meat.