Helping Senior Pets with Mobility

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Mobility in Senior Pets

As the years go by, some older pets can start to have difficulty with mobility. You may notice your senior dog lagging behind on their usual walks, or perhaps they cannot keep up with younger dogs at the dog park. Some senior cats can also exhibit decreased mobility, and may opt to lounge around more than usual, or just don’t seem to want to exert themselves as much as they once did. If you notice your senior pet has started to slow down a bit, it is important to bring them to the vet to determine if there are any underlying conditions, especially in larger dogs who may be prone to hip dysplasia or arthritis. If you or your vet suspects arthritis, there are some things you should look for including:

  • Favoring a limb
  • Difficulty sitting or standing
  • Sleeping more
  • Seeming to have stiff or sore joints
  • Hesitancy to jump, run or climb stairs
  • Weight gain
  • Decreased activity or interest in play
  • Attitude or behavior changes (including increased irritability)
  • Being less alert

If a medical condition is diagnosed, your vet may suggest a prescription medication to help alleviate symptoms. Your vet may also suggest supplements or other devices or treatments to help make your dog or cat more comfortable. 

If you dog or cat has trouble with stairs, you may want to consider a pet ramp. A ramp can be easier on your pet’s joints, especially if they are going outside to potty and finding navigating stairs difficult. Here is more information on pet ramps.

Indoor pet potties for dogs may be another alternative to having your dog potty outside. Here is more information on incontinence and indoor pet potties. 

Lifts or harnesses may also be helpful as are pet strollers and carriers. Here is more information on pet products that can help with mobility. 

Modification to exercise can also be helpful especially for dogs, including taking multiple shorter walks, swimming, indoor fetch, or stretching. 

If your vet suggests supplements as an option to their treatment, then you may want to consider something designed specifically for older dogs and cats, such as Agile Joints from Pet Wellbeing. This supplement is formulated to address mobility and help maintain a normal range of motion for cats and dogs. Old Friend from Pet Wellbeing was formulated to promote a stronger immune system and joint mobility for older dogs and cats. 

For more information about these products or how they may help your senior pets, visit their website. We do not endorse any of the products listed on our site; product information is available for informative purposes only. 

Use coupon code Elderly15 to get 15% off your purchase at Pet Wellbeing.

About Us

The Elderly Pet Organization is a 501C3 non profit organization whose mission is to provide information and education about senior pets. Our goal is to end senior pet abandonment and premature euthanization, while increasing senior pet adoptions throughout the US. We accept donations of unwanted items, as well as cash donations to help us with our cause. Read more about us.

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